Windows Vista - Lowering Screen Resolution


Published 2009-02-12 (Rev. 2015-05-25) -- Instructions for lowering screen resolution for better readability for the vision impaired using Windows Vista operating system.

Contact Details: For further information please contact Ian Langtree at

Main Document

Today's computer monitors with wide screens will in most cases shrink icons and websites to minimal size for better resolution, sometimes making everything very hard to see and read, especially for the sight impaired.

The easiest way to make everything a little bigger is by lowering the monitors screen resolution just a bit. These instructions are for Windows Vista operating system.

  • To do so right click anywhere on your desktop (basically being the first screen you see once the computer is turned on and booted) except for on an icon.
  • This will bring up a menu with several options, select the last one which is personalize, this will bring up a larger menu.
  • Proceed to choosing "Display Settings" where you will then find a slider bar with xxxx by xxx pixels.
  • Hold the slider button with your mouse button pressed and slide it towards the left once.
  • Proceed to selecting apply at the bottom left of the window, this will then make everything a little bigger. You may repeat as needed until you become comfortable with the screen resolution.

Tip: A good monitor resolution is when most websites fill your screen without having to scroll horizontally.

Right click anywhere on your desktop.

Select personalize.

Hold the slider button with your mouse button pressed and slide it towards the left.

Related Information:

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• List of Computer Screen Readers for Visually Impaired - Ian Langtree - (2014-08-06)
• Text-To-Speech Freeware Panopreter Basic Enables Computer Speak With Natural Sounding Voices - - (2013-05-23)
• Accessible ReadSpeaker docReader - Online Document Viewer of Choice - ReadSpeaker - (2014-04-10)
• Google Glass - Revolutionary Uses for Persons with Disability - Disabled World - (2013-10-25)

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