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How to Improve Communication Skills


Knowing how to improve communication skills will come easier once you become aware of your own communication style.

Tips for improving your communication skills

1. Knowing how to improve communication skills will come easier once you become aware of your own communication style.

Each person has a unique way of communicating. Listen to your own speech. What sorts of words do you use? Which sort of body language and what tone of voice are you using?

Now, think of someone who, in your opinion, is a good communicator. Compare your style to theirs. You've just taken an important first step in how to improve communication skills.

2. Now that you are aware of your own style, study the style of those around you.

How do the most important people in your life converse? How do they say things? Look for approaches you can model and make your own.

3. Adjust to the other styles of communication.

Don't think it is too late to change your way of conversing because it's been years. You had to learn to communicate in the first place and you can unlearn certain behaviors or change them. Sometimes we get stuck in a communication rut.

A father once was having a hard time with his teenaged daughter. She was growing and he thought she didn't tell him what was going on in her life. They were in a heated discussion when he asked, "Why didn't you tell me?"

Her answer was that she had, but he was too busy lecturing her to hear her. He learned that adjusting his style to his daughter would involve listening first before jumping right into solving the problem.

4. To build rapport, during a conversation try and match the other person's movements, posture and verbal style.

Don't do everything they do, but mirror one or two things. For example, if the person gives mostly short answers to questions, you follow suit.

Or, maybe they talk at a slower pace than you usually do-slow your speaking speed to match theirs. This may sound simplistic but it is a very potent way to make someone feel very relaxed and comfortable in your presence.

5. The way you communicate at home may not be the same as in a different environment.

Make sure you change your style to suit the different setting. Some comments you might want to tell your best friend, in private.

Other things can be shared in a group setting. Learn how to improve communication skills by altering your style for the appropriate setting. Many of us know someone who offers far too much information in a group setting.

6. Don't criticize others for communicating differently.

If we all communicated in the same way, we'd soon be bored with each other.

Getting a good grasp of your communication style and finding ways to accommodate other peoples' styles, is a good way to improve your communication skills.

7. Not listening Ernest Hemingway once said:

"I like to listen. I have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most people never listen."

Don't be like most people. Don't just wait eagerly for your turn to talk. Put your own ego on hold. Learn to really listen to what people actually are saying.

When you start to really listen, you'll pick up on loads of potential paths in the conversation. But avoid yes or no type of questions as they will not give you much information. If someone mentions that they went fishing with a couple of friends last weekend you can for instance ask:

* Where did you go fishing?

* What do you like most about fishing?

* What did you do there besides fishing?

The person will delve deeper into the subject giving you more information to work with and more paths for you choose from.

If they say something like: "Oh, I don't know" at first, don't give up. Prod a little further. Ask again. They do know, they just have to think about a bit more. And as they start to open up the conversation becomes more interesting because it's not on auto-pilot anymore.

8. Asking too many questions

If you ask too many questions the conversation can feel like a bit of an interrogation. Or like you don't have that much too contribute. One alternative is to mix questions with statements. Continuing the conversation above you could skip the question and say:

* Yeah, it's great to just get out with your friends and relax over the weekend. We like to take a six-pack out to the park and play some Frisbee golf.

* Nice. We went out in my friend's boat last month and I tried these new lures from Sakamura. The blue ones were really great.

And then the conversation can flow on from there. And you can discuss Frisbee golf, the advantages/disadvantages of different lures or your favourite beer.

9. Tightening up

When in conversation with someone you just meet or when the usual few topics are exhausted an awkward silence or mood might appear. Or you might just become nervous not knowing exactly why.

* Leil Lowndes once said: "Never leave home without reading the newspaper." If you're running out of things to say, you can always start talking about the current news. It's also good to stay updated on current water cooler-topics. Like what happened on the latest episode of Lost.

* Comment on the aquarium at the party, or that one girl's cool Halloween-costume or the host's mp3-playlist. You can always start new conversations about something in your surroundings.

* Assume rapport. If you feel nervous or weird when meeting someone for the first time assume rapport. What that means is that you imagine how you feel when you meet one of your best friends. And pretend that this new acquaintance is one of your best friends. Don't overdo it though, you might not want to hug and kiss right away. But if you imagine this you'll go into a positive emotional state. And you'll greet and start talking to this new person with a smile and a friendly and relaxed attitude. Because that's how you talk to your friends. It might sound a bit loopy or too simple. But it really works.

10. Poor delivery

One of the most important things in a conversation is not what you say, but how you say it. A change in these habits can make a big difference since your voice and body language is a vital part of communication. Some things to think about:

* Slowing down. When you get excited about something it's easy to start talking faster and faster. Try and slow down. It will make it much easier for people to listen and for you actually get what you are saying across to them.

* Speaking up. Don't be afraid to talk as loud as you need to for people to hear you.

* Speaking clearly. Don't mumble.

* Speak with emotion. No one listens for that long if you speak with a monotone voice. Let your feelings be reflected in your voice.

* Using pauses. Slowing down your talking plus adding a small pause between thoughts or sentences creates a bit of tension and anticipation. People will start to listen more attentively to what you're saying. Listen to one of Brian Tracys cds or Steve Pavlina's podcasts. Listen to how using small pauses makes what they are saying seem even more interesting.

* Learn a bit about improving your body language as it can make your delivery a lot more effective. Read about laughter, posture and how to hold your drink in 18 ways to improve your body language.

11. Hogging the spot-light

I've been guilty of this one on more occasions than I wish to remember. :) Everyone involved in a conversation should get their time in the spotlight. Don't interrupt someone when they are telling some anecdote or their view on what you are discussing to divert the attention back to yourself. Don't hijack their story about skiing before it's finished to share your best skiing-anecdote. Find a balance between listening and talking.

12. Having to be right

Avoid arguing and having to being right about every topic. Often a conversation is not really a discussion. It's a more of a way to keep a good mood going. No one will be that impressed if you "win" every conversation. Instead just sit back, relax and help keep the good feelings going.

13. Being boring

Don't prattle on about your new car for 10 minutes oblivious to your surroundings. Always be prepared to drop a subject when you start to bore people. Or when everyone is getting bored and the topic is starting to run out of steam.

One good way to have something interesting to say is simply to lead an interesting life. And to focus on the positive stuff. Don't start to whine about your boss or your job, people don't want to hear that. Instead, talk about your last trip somewhere, some funny anecdote that happened while you where buying clothes, your plans for New Years Eve or something funny or exciting.

Another way is just to be genuinely interested. As Dale Carnegie said:

"You can make more friends in two months by becoming really interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you. Which is just another way of saying that the way to make a friend is to be one."

Knowing a little about many things or at least being open to talk about them instead of trying to steer the conversation back to your favourite subject is a nice quality.

Meaning: talking for what seems like hours about one topic. Topics may include work, favourite rock-band, TV-show and more work. Opening up a bit and not clinging desperately to one topic will make the conversation feel more relaxed and open. You will come across like a person who can talk about many things with ease. As you've probably experienced with other people; this quality is something you appreciate in a conversation and makes you feel like you can connect to that person easily.

14. Not reciprocating

Open up and say what you think, share how you feel. If someone shares an experience, open up too and share one of your experiences. Don't just stand there nodding and answer with short sentences. If someone is investing in the conversation they'd like you to invest too.

Like in so many areas in life, you can't always wait for the other party to make the first move. When needed, be proactive and be the first one to open up and invest in the conversation. One way is by replacing some questions with statements. It makes you less passive and makes take a sort of stand.

15. Not contributing much

You might feel that you don't have much to contribute to a conversation. But try anyway. Really listen and be interested in what the others are saying. Ask questions. Make relating statements.

Open your eyes too. Develop your observational skills to pick up interesting stuff in your surroundings to talk about. Develop your personal knowledge-bank by expanding your view of interesting things in the world. Read the newspapers and keep an eye on new water cooler-topics.

Work on your body language, how you talk and try assuming rapport to improve your communication skills.

But take it easy. Don't do it all at once. You'll just feel confused and overwhelmed. Instead, pick out the three most important things that you feel needs improving. Work on them every day for 3-4 weeks. Notice the difference and keep at it. Soon your new habits will start to pop up spontaneously when you are in a conversation.

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