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Omega 9 Fatty Acids


Omega 9 is the most abundant fatty acid in nature, and is not in short supply in our diets. When the body doesn't have enough omega 3 or omega 6, it tries to compensate by producing omega 9 fatty acids to take their place.

What is Omega 9 Fatty Acid?

Omega 9 is the most abundant fatty acid in nature, and is not in short supply in our diets.

Two important polyunsaturated fatty acids are linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid.

Linoleic acid is used to build omega 6 fatty acids and alpha-linolenic acid is used to build omega 3 fatty acids.

Omega 9 fatty acid is a monounsaturated fat that is also known as, oleic acid. Omega 9 is not technically an essential fatty acid because the body can produce a limited amount, provided the essential fatty acids, omega 3 and omega 6, are present so it does not need to be supplemented.

Omega 9 is mainly used when there is an insufficiency of either omega 3, omega 6 or both. When the body doesn't have enough omega 3 or omega 6, it tries to compensate by producing omega 9 fatty acids to take their place.

Some n−9s are common components of animal fat and vegetable oil. Two n−9 fatty acids important in industry are: Oleic acid (18:1, n−9), which is a main component of olive oil and other monounsaturated fats and Erucic acid (22:1, n−9), which is found in rapeseed, wallflower seed, and mustard seed.

Omega 9 plays a role in lowering cholesterol levels and promotes healthy inflammation responses.

Omega 9 may also aid in the production of prostaglandins, which have many great health benefits. Omega 9 should be present in the body in healthy ratios as compared to omega 3 and omega 6. The oil made by our skin glands is the same omega 9 fatty acid found abundantly in olive oil.

Food Sources of Omega 9:

Omega 9 is present in all animals and plants; excellent sources include olive, canola, peanut, safflower, and sunflower oils.

These fats are found in good quality virgin oil, much better for salad dressings if used sparingly.

Other great sources are avocados, peanut butter, nuts and seeds.

Omega 9 Cautions:

There are no recorded side effects from the use of omega 9.

As omega 9 is typically used in ratio with omega 3 and omega 6, be cautious if using anticoagulants or antiplatelet drugs due to the increased risk of bleeding.

As with all drugs and supplements, consult a health care professional before use. Omega 9 has no reported side effects but as it is used with omega 3 and omega 6, watch triglyceride levels.

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