Wearable Artificial Vision Device May Help Legally Blind to Read

Author: American Academy of Ophthalmology
Published: 2016/10/28 - Updated: 2020/04/23
Peer-Reviewed: N/A
Contents: Summary - Main - Related Publications

Synopsis: Artificial vision device may help people who are legally blind read, recognize faces, and accomplish everyday tasks with greater ease than traditional assistive reading devices. Study participants performed tests simulating activities of daily life, including recognizing products and reading emails, letters, newspapers, book and signs. The device clips to glasses and uses a camera to see and recognize what the user is viewing, text or a face, and reads what it to the user via a small bone-conduction earpiece.

Main Digest

Wearable artificial vision device shows promise in helping people who are legally blind to read - Study shows potential of assistive technology to improve quality of life for the visually impaired.

Legal blindness is defined as a level of visual impairment that has been classified by law either to limit allowed activities (such as driving) for safety reasons or to determine eligibility for government-funded disability benefits in the form of educational, service, or monetary assistance. The World Health Organization (WHO) uses the following classifications of visual impairment. When the vision in the better eye with best possible glasses correction is:

Continued below image.
Orcam My Eye - Photo Credit: ISRAEL21c - American Academy of Ophthalmolo
Orcam My Eye - Photo Credit: ISRAEL21c - American Academy of Ophthalmolo
Continued...

A unique wearable artificial vision device may help people who are legally blind "read" and recognize faces. It may also help these individuals accomplish everyday tasks with significantly greater ease than using traditional assistive reading devices, suggests a study presented today at AAO 2016, the 120th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Approximately 246 million people worldwide have low vision.(1) This sight loss impairs a person's ability to do simple daily tasks. Optical and electronic devices such as hand-held magnifiers, tele-microscopic glasses and computer and video magnifiers can help. But, typically these devices are bulky, cumbersome or not readily portable. With recent advancements in wearable electronic devices and optical character recognition technology that converts images to computer-readable text, University of California, Davis researchers hypothesized that these newer technologies could help improve patients' ability to function in daily life. To test their theory, researchers asked a group of visually impaired patients to use a wearable artificial vision device to see its impact. They found that the device vastly improved patients' daily productivity.

The researchers used the Orcam My Eye for their study.

The device is unique because it clips to glasses, making it hands-free. It features a miniature camera that sees and recognizes what the user is viewing, whether text or a face, and then reads what it is seeing to the user via a small bone-conduction earpiece. The user activates the device by simply pointing a finger to the object or text, tapping it or pressing a trigger button.

Researchers tested the device on 12 legally blind people, who all had a visual acuity of less than 20/200. Study participants performed a 10-item test simulating activities of daily life, including recognizing products and reading a variety of items such as emails, letters, newspapers, book and signs. They earned one point for the successful completion of each item, and a zero for each not completed. The total possible score was 10. The researchers studied the participants at three stages. First, they observed the participants doing the tasks without the device, then while wearing it after receiving a 90- to 120-minute training session and finally after wearing the device for one week.

The researchers' findings were as follows:

"While there have been many advances in eye care, the options for assistance in completing daily tasks are limited and cumbersome," said Elad Moisseiev, M.D., a vitreoretinal surgeon who was the study lead at U.C. Davis, but is now with the Tel Aviv Medical Center, Israel. "This represents a new step in the evolution of assistance devices for people with low vision, giving them hope for improving their functionality, independence and quality of life."

The pilot study was the first to evaluate the device in people with low vision, establishing its efficacy and ease of use and demonstrating the achievement of statistically significant differences in test scores, said Dr. Moisseiev. He noted that additional studies should include more people, ideally stratifying them by level of visual impairment.

A Portable Artificial Vision Device is a Useful Aid for Patients with Low Vision was presented at AAO 2016, the 120th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. The event was held in conjunction with the Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology Oct. 14-18 at McCormick Place, Chicago. Known as the place "Where all of Ophthalmology MeetsĀ®," the Academy's annual meeting is the world's largest conference for eye physicians and surgeons.

Legally Blind: Facts and Statistics

1 - www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs282/en/

Attribution/Source(s):

This quality-reviewed publication pertaining to our Disability Visual Aids section was selected for circulation by the editors of Disabled World due to its likely interest to our disability community readers. Though the content may have been edited for style, clarity, or length, the article "Wearable Artificial Vision Device May Help Legally Blind to Read" was originally written by American Academy of Ophthalmology, and submitted for publishing on 2016/10/28 (Edit Update: 2020/04/23). Should you require further information or clarification, American Academy of Ophthalmology can be contacted at aao.org. Disabled World makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith.

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