Skip to main content
- Smaller Text | + Larger Text

Electronic Eye Cane Enhances Mobility for the Blind

Printer icon
  • Synopsis: Published: 2014-10-20 (Rev. 2016-06-11) - The EyeCane for the blind and visually impaired translates point-distance information into auditory and tactile cues after less than five minutes of training. For further information pertaining to this article contact: IOSPress_STM at Daphne Watrin - Email: d.watrin@iospress.nl.

Main Document

"One of the key results we show here is that even after less than five minutes of training, participants were able to complete the tasks successfully."

User-friendly electronic 'EyeCane' enhances navigational abilities for the blind - Tactile or auditory cues can enhance the mobility of blind users, according to study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience...

White Canes provide low-tech assistance to the visually impaired, but some blind people object to their use because they are cumbersome, fail to detect elevated obstacles, or require long training periods to master. Electronic travel aids (ETAs) have the potential to improve navigation for the blind, but early versions had disadvantages that limited widespread adoption. A new ETA, the "EyeCane," developed by a team of researchers at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, expands the world of its users, allowing them to better estimate distance, navigate their environment, and avoid obstacles, according to a new study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience.

"The EyeCane was designed to augment, or possibly in the more distant future, replace the traditional White Cane by adding information at greater distances (5 meters) and more angles, and most importantly by eliminating the need for contacts between the cane and the user's surroundings [which makes its use difficult] in cluttered or indoor environments," says Amir Amedi, PhD, Associate Professor of Medical Neurobiology at The Israel-Canada Institute for Medical Research, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

The EyeCane translates point-distance information into auditory and tactile cues.

The device is able to provide the user with distance information simultaneously from two different directions: directly ahead for long distance perception and detection of waist-height obstacles and pointing downward at a 45 degree angle for ground-level assessment. The user scans a target with the device, the device emits a narrow beam with high spatial resolution toward the target, the beam hits the target and is returned to the device, and the device calculates the distance and translates it for the user interface. The user learns intuitively within a few minutes to decode the distance to the object via sound frequencies and/or vibration amplitudes.

Recent improvements have streamlined the device so its size is 4 x 6 x 12 centimeters with a weight of less than 100 grams. "This enables it to be easily held and pointed at different targets, while increasing battery life," says Prof. Amedi.

The authors conducted a series of experiments to evaluate the usefulness of the device for both blind and blindfolded sighted individuals.

Fig 1. This is a flow chart depicting the use of the device and an illustration of a user. Note the two sensor beams, one pointing directly ahead, and one pointing towards the ground for obstacle detection.Picture Credit: Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience
Fig 1. This is a flow chart depicting the use of the device and an illustration of a user. Note the two sensor beams, one pointing directly ahead, and one pointing towards the ground for obstacle detection.Picture Credit: Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience
The aim of the first experiment was to see if the device could help in distance estimation. After less than five minutes of training, both blind and blindfolded individuals were able to estimate distance successfully almost 70% of the time, and the success rate surpassed 80% for two of the three blind participants. "It was amazing seeing how this additional distance changed their perception of their environment," notes Shachar Maidenbaum, one of the researchers on Prof. Amedi's team. "One user described it as if her hand was suddenly on the far side of the room, expanding her world."

A second experiment looked at whether the EyeCane could help individuals navigate an unfamiliar corridor by measuring the number of contacts with the walls. Those using a White Cane made an average of 28.2 contacts with the wall, compared to three contacts with the EyeCane - a statistically significant tenfold reduction. A third experiment demonstrated that the EyeCane also helped users avoid chairs and other naturally occurring obstacles placed randomly in the surroundings.

"One of the key results we show here is that even after less than five minutes of training, participants were able to complete the tasks successfully," says Prof. Amedi. "This short training requirement is very significant, as it make the device much more user friendly. Every one of our blind users wanted to take the device home with them after the experiment, and felt they could immediately contribute to their everyday lives," adds Maidenbaum.

The Amedi lab is also involved in other projects for helping people who are blind. In another recent publication in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience they introduced the EyeMusic, which offers much more information, but requires more intensive training. "We see the two technologies as complementary" says Prof. Amedi. "You would use the EyeMusic to recognize landmarks or an object and use the EyeCane to get to it safely while avoiding collisions."

For more information visit the Amedi lab website at brain.huji.ac.il where you can also experience an online virtual demonstration of the device.

Below: Video Demonstration of the EyeCane:



Related:

  1. Eyeglasses That Can Read to the Blind - Florida International University - (2013-04-12)
    https://www.disabled-world.com/assistivedevices/visual/reading.php
  2. Seeing Through Virtual Touch for Vision Impaired - University of Cincinnati - (2014-08-11)
    https://www.disabled-world.com/assistivedevices/visual/enactive-torch.php
  3. eSight Eyewear Device Enables People with Vision Disabilities to See - eSight Corporation - (2014-05-20)
    https://www.disabled-world.com/assistivedevices/visual/esight.php

Comments and Discussion



Newsletter

     What will I receive?

Money ChartLoan Information for low income singles, families, seniors and disabled. Includes home, vehicle and personal loans.


Albert EinsteinFamous People with Disabilities - Well known people with disabilities and conditions who contributed to society.


Pink awareness ribbonList of awareness ribbon colors and their meaning. Also see our calendar of awareness dates.


Chart IconBlood Pressure Chart - What should your blood pressure be. Also see information on blood group types and compatibility.


  1. We Rock the Spectrum - Autism and Special Needs Resource Fair - Los Angeles
  2. Taking Eye Fatigue Out of Virtual Reality With New 3D Display
  3. Yemen Cholera Outbreak Is The World's Worst
  4. NAELA President's Statement on the Senate Health Care Reform Legislation




Citation