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When Will I Go Bald? Find Out with Our Hair Loss Calculator

  • Synopsis: Published: 2010-12-26 (Rev. 2017-06-25) - Find out at what age you may start to experience hair loss and lose your hair or go bald with our hair loss calculator. For further information pertaining to this article contact: Ian Langtree at Disabled World.

Definition: Baldness and Hair Loss

Male-pattern hair loss - (ndrogenic alopecia or Male pattern baldness (MPB)), is defined as hair loss that occurs due to an underlying susceptibility of hair follicles to androgenic miniaturization. It is the most common cause of hair loss and will affect up to 70% of men and 40% of women at some point in their lifetimes.

Hair loss - Also known as alopecia or baldness, is defined as the loss of hair from the head or body. Baldness can refer to general hair loss or male pattern hair loss. Some types of hair loss can be caused by alopecia areata, an autoimmune disorder. The extreme forms of alopecia areata are alopecia totalis, which involves the loss of all head hair, and alopecia universalis, which involves the loss of all hair from the head and the body.

Main Document

"When more than 100 hairs fall out per day, clinical hair loss (telogen effluvium) may occur."

Alopecia is the medical term for the loss of hair from the head or body, sometimes to the extent of baldness.

There is a widely held misconception that hair is alive, and, therefore, its condition can be "permanently" altered by using some newly discovered commercial potion. The truth is that hair is only living matter at its base below the surface of the scalp. Like the tip of one's finger nail, hair is dead matter, and can be clipped shorter and discarded.

Normally about 100 hairs reach the end of their resting phase each day and fall out. When more than 100 hairs fall out per day, clinical hair loss (telogen effluvium) may occur. A disruption of the growing phase causes abnormal loss of anagen hairs (anagen effluvium).

The severity and nature of baldness can vary greatly; it does range from male and female pattern alopecia, alopecia areata, which involves the loss of just some of the hair from the head, and alopecia totalis, which involves the loss of all head hair, to the most extreme form, alopecia universalis, which involves the loss of all hair from the head and the whole body.

Male Pattern Baldness (androgenetic alopecia) will affect a lot of men, and is a result of a combination of factors including age, hormones, and genes. The gene is said to be passed from mother to child, so if a man wants to ascertain his chances of hair loss, it would be more indicative to look at his mother's father rather than his own father.

Hair Loss Calculator - When Will I Lose my Hair or go Bald

Enter Your Age: You did not enter a valid Age(please enter 0-99)

Select Your Current Stage or Hair Growth/Loss:
Stage1: Full Head of Hair
Full Head of Hair.
Stage2: Hairline has begun to recede
Hairline has begun to recede.
Stage3: Hairline has receded along forehead
Hairline has receded along forehead and thin hair on top/back of head.
Stage4: Significant thin or bald hair on top/back of head
Significant thin or bald hair on top/back of head
Stage5: Complete hair loss on top of head. Only sides remain
Complete hair loss on top of head Only sides remain
Select Your Average Level Of Stress You Encounter Daily
Family Hair Loss History. Check all that apply
My biological Father has experienced hair loss
My Grandfather on my biological Mother's Side has experienced hair loss
My Grandfather on my biological Father's Side has experienced hair loss

NOTE: The hair loss calculator was created for entertainment purposes only. While results are generated from research and data provided by several doctors, the result is not a guarantee of if or when you will lose your hair. Always consult your doctor or physician for a professional assessment of any medical or hair loss condition.

Treatment for Hair Loss Includes:

Anthralin (Dritho-Scalp): Available as a cream or ointment that is applied to the scalp and washed off daily.

Corticosteroids: Injections of cortisone into the scalp can be used to treat alopecia areata. This type of treatment is repeated on a monthly basis.

Finasteride (Propecia): Used in male-pattern hair loss it a pill form taken on a daily basis. Finasteride is not indicated for women and is not recommended in pregnant women. Treatment is effective within 6 to 8 months of treatment.

Hair transplant: A dermatologist or cosmetic surgeon takes tiny plugs of skin, each which contains a few hairs, and implants the plugs into bald sections. The plugs are generally taken from the back or sides of your scalp.

Hormonal Modulators: Oral contraceptives or spironolactone can be used for female-pattern hair loss associated with hyperandrogenemia.

Minoxidil (Rogaine): A non-prescription medication approved for androgenetic alopecia and alopecia areata. Minoxidil comes in a liquid or foam that is rubbed into your scalp twice a day. This is the most effective method to treat male-pattern and female-pattern hair loss.

Scalp Reduction: This process is the decreasing of the area of bald skin on your head. As time goes, the skin on our head becomes flexible and stretched enough that some of it can be surgically removed.

Surgical Options: Treatment options such as follicle transplant, scalp flaps, and alopecia reduction are available.

Wigs: As an alternative to medical and surgical treatment, some patients wear a wig or hairpiece. They can be used permanently or temporarily to cover the hair loss. Quality, and natural looking wigs and hairpieces are available.

Help for Baldness on the Way

A new research report appearing in the April 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal (www.fasebj.org) explains why people with a rare balding condition called "atrichia with papular lesions" lose their hair, and it identifies a strategy for reversing this hair loss. Specifically the report shows for the first time that the "human hairless gene" imparts an essential role in hair biology by regulating a subset of other hair genes. This newly discovered molecular function likely explains why mutations in the hairless gene contribute to the pathogenesis of atrichia with papular lesions. In addition, this gene also has also been shown to function as a tumor suppressor gene in the skin, raising hope for developing new approaches in the treatment of skin disorders and/or some cancers.

Will I go Bald? Hair Loss Calculator - Provided By www.frontal-hair-transplants.com

Facts: Hair Loss

Symptoms of hair loss include hair loss in patches usually in circular patterns, dandruff, skin lesions, and scarring. Alopecia areata (mild - medium level) usually shows in unusual hair loss areas e.g. eyebrows, backside of the head or above the ears where usually the male pattern baldness does not affect. In male-pattern hair loss, loss and thinning begin at the temples and the crown and either thins out or falls out. Female-pattern hair loss occurs at the frontal and parietal.



Related:

  1. Hair Care Myths and Tips
  2. What Causes Gray Hair
  3. ROGAINE - Hair Loss Fact and Fiction - ROGAINE - (2010-02-01)

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