AAIDD Definition of Intellectual Disability - SSA Criteria for Evaluating Mental Disorders

Author: American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD)
Published: 2010/09/07 - Updated: 2023/02/19 - Peer-Reviewed: Yes
Contents: Summary - Main - Related Publications

Synopsis: The AAIDD definition of intellectual disability cited in SSA proposed revision of medical criteria for evaluating mental disorders. While intellectual functioning, adaptive behavior, and age of onset remain the criteria for diagnosing intellectual disability, supports remain the cornerstone of the AAIDD System. Once a diagnosis of intellectual disability is made, planning and providing support is the key to aligning a person's capabilities and skills with what is required to participate in daily life successfully.

American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) is an American non-profit organization focusing on intellectual disability and related developmental disabilities. AAIDD has members in the United States and more than 50 other countries. The AAIDD's stated mission is to promote progressive policies, sound research, practical practices, and universal human rights for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Main Digest

The AAIDD Definition of Intellectual Disability is Cited in SSA's Proposed Revision of Medical Criteria for Evaluating Mental Disorders. Individualized supports remain a cornerstone of the AAIDD System of diagnosing and defining intellectual disability.

The definition of intellectual disability as cited in the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities' definition manual, Intellectual Disability: Definition, Classification, and Systems of Supports (Eleventh edition), is now part of the U.S. Social Security Administration's (SSA) Revised Medical Criteria for Mental Disorders as it appears in the Federal Register.

The proposed changes intend to update the criteria for eligibility for benefits under titles II and XVI of the Social Security Act (notably SSI and SSDI) so that applications will be evaluated based on the most current diagnostic criteria, assessment strategies, and understanding of the course of the disability.

"The Social Security Administration is to be commended for taking steps to assure that the applications for the determination of disability are evaluated in a manner consistent with current research and public opinion," says Margaret Nygren, EdD, Executive Director and CEO of AAIDD.

"As a result of this clarification, applications will be evaluated more appropriately, and people with intellectual and other disabilities will receive the benefits to which they are entitled."

The AAIDD System is based on an advanced view of disability that providing proper support will enhance the functioning of a person with an intellectual disability.

While intellectual functioning, adaptive behavior, and age of onset remain the criteria for diagnosing intellectual disability, supports remain the cornerstone of the AAIDD System.

Once a diagnosis of intellectual disability is made, planning and providing support is the key to aligning a person's capabilities and skills with what is required to participate in daily life successfully.

"The focus of the AAIDD System on individualized supports, and its strong basis in research, professional standards, and informed clinical judgment allow professionals and service providers to plan progressive services and enhance the quality of life of people living with an intellectual disability," says Robert L. Schalock, Ph.D., co-author of Intellectual Disability.

Founded in 1876, AAIDD promotes progressive policies, sound research, effective practices, and universal human rights for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Attribution/Source(s):

This peer reviewed publication titled "AAIDD Definition of Intellectual Disability - SSA Criteria for Evaluating Mental Disorders" was chosen for publishing by Disabled World's editors due to its relevance to our readers in the disability community. While the content may have been edited for style, clarity, or brevity, it was originally authored by American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) and published 2010/09/07 (Edit Update: 2023/02/19). For further details or clarifications, you can contact American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) directly at aaidd.org. Please note that Disabled World does not provide any warranties or endorsements related to this article.

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Cite This Page (APA): American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD). (2010, September 7). AAIDD Definition of Intellectual Disability - SSA Criteria for Evaluating Mental Disorders. Disabled World. Retrieved April 21, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/definitions/intellectual-disability-definition.php

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