Most People Will Need Long-Term Care at Some Stage

Ian C. Langtree Content Writer/Editor for Disabled World
Published: 2011/11/21 - Updated: 2022/06/02
Contents: Summary - Introduction - Main - Related

Synopsis: Long-term care encompasses the support services people might need when they struggle with disability or chronic disease. Long-term care should keep people as independent as possible and can be specifically designed around the unique needs of individuals. In that spirit, most long-term care services are supplied right in a person's own home, most often by unpaid relatives, partners, or friends. Basic needs requiring long-term care services stem from physical conditions like broken bones or arthritis, or from a mental impairment that causes symptoms like confusion or memory loss.

Introduction

The National Institutes of Health says that almost three-quarters of those over 65 will need long-term care at some level. Long-term care encompasses the support services people might need when they struggle with a disability or chronic disease. Most obviously, such a patient needs skilled medical care, but the particular condition may also affect other aspects of life. For example, the person may also require personal help with the core activities of daily living - ADLs for short - such as dressing, walking, bathing, or eating.

Main Digest

Long-term care also includes help, when necessary, with so-called instrumental activities of daily living such as chores, shopping, emergency preparedness, cooking, pet care, staying in touch with others via phone or other communication modes, and money and medication management. In essence, IADLs are those tasks people do to maintain safe, healthy homes and live normal lives in the community.

Basic needs requiring long-term care services stem from physical conditions like broken bones or arthritis, or from a mental impairment that causes symptoms like confusion or memory loss.

Likelihood of Need

Of course most long-term care services are used by the elderly, but younger people may need them too after illness or injury. We all hope to remain independent, but the statistics do not necessarily support that dream. The National Institutes of Health says that almost three-quarters of those over 65 will need long-term care at some level.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture in conjunction with America's Health Insurance Plans, known as AHIP, provides some relevant statistics:

Service Delivery Options

Long-term care should keep people as independent as possible and can be specifically designed around the unique needs of individuals. In that spirit, most long-term care services are supplied right in a person's own home, most often by unpaid relatives, partners, or friends. However, sometimes paid professional providers like home health aides, companion services or housekeepers are necessary.

A wide variety of community-based services meets some long-term care needs that help people stay out of residential facilities. Examples of such programs include meal delivery, adult day care centers, and transportation.

The most intensive - and usually most expensive - long-term care is that delivered in residential facilities like residential nursing homes, also called skilled nursing facilities or SNFs. Other residential options include adult foster care or assisted living centers.

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Cite This Page (APA): Langtree, I. C. (2011, November 21 - Last revised: 2022, June 2). Most People Will Need Long-Term Care at Some Stage. Disabled World. Retrieved June 15, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/disability/caregivers/longtermcare.php

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