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SSI and SSDI Benefits for Children with Disability

  • Published: 2010-05-24 (Rev. 2010-07-19) - Contact: Jonathan Ginsberg
  • Synopsis: Children who are diagnosed as disabled may be eligible for SSI or SSDI benefits.

Main Document

Info on Child SSI/Child Disability Benefits

Children who are diagnosed as disabled may be eligible for SSI or SSDI benefits. The SSA employs special rules in order to evaluate the medical basis for which the child has become disabled. Only when the child meets the medical requirements for their specific disability (which are published by the SSA) will benefits be approved and payable. Additionally, the total household income will also be taken into consideration. Oftentimes, if both parents are working, those benefits may be denied.

Qualification requirements

The SSA has two disability programs available for disabled children just like they do with adults who are disabled - SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance) and SSI (Supplemental Security Income). These differ based on the age of the child whose benefits are being applied for. The following is a listing of the requirements for both.

Program #1 - SSI benefits A child from birth to the age of 18 may be able to receive SSI benefits under this particular program based on a medical condition or blindness. There are 2 requirements they must meet in order to qualify for SSI benefits:

They have an impairment or multiple impairments which meets the disability definition according to the SSA

it must be proven that the impairment(s) have caused marked or severe limitations to the child's functions and that these may eventually result in the child's death, as well as the condition being expected to last or has lasted for 12 consecutive months.

The parent's and disabled child's income and resources fall within the SSA's allowable limits.

Program #2 - SSDI benefits Under this program an "adult child" is defined as a person who is 18 years old (or older) and may be eligible for monthly benefits based on either their disability or blindness provided the following requirements are met:

The adult child has an impairment or a combination of impairments which meets the SSA's definition of disability.

The onset of their disability occurred before they reached the age of 22.

The parent of the adult child has worked a sufficient amount of time so that they are insured by Social Security, is receiving either disability or retirement benefits, or is deceased.

On a closing note, it should be noted that there is a common thread between both of these programs and that is that the child in question is not performing any substantial work.

Jonathan Ginsberg has been practicing Social Security Disability law in the Atlanta, Georgia area for over 20 years. His website can be found at www.atlantasocialsecuritydisabilityattorney.net







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