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IQ Tests Special Education Verbal or Non-Verbal

Published: 2009-03-01 - Updated: 2018-05-06
Author: JoAnn Collins | Contact: www.disabilitydeception.com
Peer-Reviewed Publication: N/A
Additional References: Special Education Publications

Synopsis: By understanding the difference between verbal and non verbal IQ tests you will be able to ask for the IQ test that will appropriately measure your childs academic ability.

Is your child with autism or a learning disability going to be given an IQ test by special education personnel, and are you concerned that the IQ score may not be accurate due to your child's disability?

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Main Digest

Is your child with autism or a learning disability going to be given an IQ test by special education personnel, and are you concerned that the IQ score may not be accurate due to your child's disability?

Related Publications:

Would you like to know about verbal and non verbal IQ tests to see which one would give an accurate IQ score? This article will discuss verbal IQ tests that are usually given by school psychologist vs. non verbal IQ tests that may more accurately reflect your child's academic ability.

IQ tests are used by psychologists school or private, to determine what a child's cognitive functioning and intelligence are.

The IQ tests used by most school psychologist are based on the child's ability to understand and use language. If a child with a disability has a serious language based disability such as dyslexia, the language based IQ test may not accurately reflect the child's intelligence.

Why is this important?

Because many special education personnel have such low expectations for children with disabilities, that a low IQ score gives them another reason, to not provide needed appropriate special education academic services. The IQ score must be accurate, in order to determine what a child is academically capable of.

The Weschler Intelligence Scale is an IQ test that is often used by school psychologists to determine cognitive ability.

The Weschler Intelligence Scale test not only provides excellent predictors of academic achievement but can also be used to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the child. But children with severe language based disabilities may have very low scores on the Weschlers.

Non-Verbal IQ tests are designed to give a comprehensive, standardized assessment of general intelligence with entirely nonverbal administration and response formats.

Two tests that may be used are:

By understanding the difference between verbal and non verbal IQ tests you will be able to ask for the IQ test that will appropriately measure your child's academic ability.

Reference Source(s):

IQ Tests Special Education Verbal or Non-Verbal | JoAnn Collins (www.disabilitydeception.com). Disabled World makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith. Content may have been edited for style, clarity or length.

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Cite This Page (APA): JoAnn Collins. (2009, March 1). IQ Tests Special Education Verbal or Non-Verbal. Disabled World. Retrieved December 3, 2022 from www.disabled-world.com/disability/education/special/iq-tests.php

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