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What Happens After You Register with FEMA for Disaster Assistance

  • Published: 2017-02-01 : FEMA (fema.gov).
  • Synopsis: Information on the process of registering and waiting for FEMA disaster assistance.
Federal Emergency Management Agency

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is an agency of the United States Department of Homeland Security. The agency's primary purpose is to coordinate the response to a disaster that has occurred in the United States and that overwhelms the resources of local and state authorities. While on-the-ground support of disaster recovery efforts is a major part of FEMA's charter, the agency provides state and local governments with experts in specialized fields and funding for rebuilding efforts and relief funds for infrastructure by directing individuals to access low interest loans, in conjunction with the Small Business Administration.

Main Document

Quote: "...those who are deaf or hard of hearing, blind or have low vision, and those with speech disabilities may request reasonable accommodations to aid in communication."

Within 10 days after you've registered with U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for disaster assistance, a FEMA-contracted inspector should contact you and may schedule an appointment to visit the home.

Housing Inspections

Inspectors do not determine an applicant's eligibility for assistance.

The applicant will be asked to provide documentation to the inspector.

Upon arrival, the FEMA inspectors will display official contractor photo identification. If the photo ID is not visible, it is important for survivors to ask to see it. This helps prevent fraud.

FEMA's housing inspectors verify disaster damage to the structure, building systems and major appliances, and enter the information electronically into FEMA computers. Inspectors do not need to document all damage.

An inspection generally requires 20-45 minutes to complete the assessment. To speed the process, applicants should:

What to expect from inspectors:

Disaster survivors with communication-related disabilities - those who are deaf or hard of hearing, blind or have low vision, and those with speech disabilities - may request reasonable accommodations to aid in communication. For instance, survivors may request an American Sign Language interpreter. Accommodations can be requested by calling (800) 621-3362.

Important Survivor Tips

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