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U.S. Jails Hold More Mentally Ill Persons Than Hospitals

Author: Joe D. Gonzales Law Office(i) : Contact: joegonzales.com

Published: 2010-08-21 : (Rev. 2020-03-17)

Synopsis and Key Points:

Authors of the study - More Mentally Ill Persons are in Jails and Prisons Than Hospitals: A Survey of the States - outline several problems associated with housing mentally ill persons in jails and prisons rather than hospitals.

Authors of the study outline several problems associated with housing mentally ill persons in jails and prisons rather than hospitals: - The rate of recidivism.

Other issues the study cites include the fact that mentally ill inmates commit suicide at a greater rate than the general prison population.

Main Digest

More mentally ill persons housed in state prisons than in hospitals. Read more about the issues in keeping mentally ill prisoners.

According to a new study, states such as Texas, Nevada and Arizona have far greater numbers of mentally ill persons housed in state prisons than in hospitals.

The study, "More Mentally Ill Persons are in Jails and Prisons Than Hospitals: A Survey of the States," was released in May by the Treatment Advocacy Center and the National Sheriffs' Association.

The study used data from 2004 and 2005 gleaned from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Bureau of Justice Statistics to compare the number of inmates with mental health issues in state jails and prisons with those in hospitals.

The study used a baseline assumption that 16 percent of inmates in each state's penal system had a mental illness. The 16 percent figure is an increase of nearly 300 percent since 1983, when studies estimated the prison population contained only 6.4 percent mentally ill inmates.

The study then compared this number with the total number of patients in each state's mental institutions.

Image of a persons hands and forearms wearing handcuffs.
Image of a persons hands and forearms wearing handcuffs.

What the numbers showed was that in nearly every case (North Dakota being the sole exception), each state had more mentally ill inmates in jails and prisons than mentally ill patients in hospitals. In fact, the national average was slightly more than 3-to-1 mentally ill inmates in jails in prisons to mentally ill patients in hospitals.

In Texas, the number ballooned to nearly eight times as many mentally ill inmates in jails and prisons to mentally ill patients in hospitals. Only Nevada and Arizona, with close to a 10-to-1 ratio, had worse ratios.

Issues of Housing Mentally Ill Inmates in Jails

Authors of the study outline several problems associated with housing mentally ill persons in jails and prisons rather than hospitals:

Other issues the study cites include the fact that mentally ill inmates commit suicide at a greater rate than the general prison population, and mentally ill inmates are easier targets for abuse by other prisoners and prison staff.

Similar Articles of Interest:

The study's authors offer solutions, such as assisted outpatient treatment, mental health courts (which offer offenders the choice of treatment or prison), federal money tied to fewer mentally ill prisoners, and reformed federal funding and treatment laws.

If you have been arrested for a crime and suffer from a mental illness, please call an experienced criminal defense attorney right away.

(i)Source/Reference: Joe D. Gonzales Law Office. Disabled World makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith. Content may have been edited for style, clarity or length.

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