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Social Security Disability - Basic Information

Author: Berger and Green

Published: 2010-10-04

Synopsis and Key Points:

According to the Social Security Administration, a 20-year-old worker has a three in ten chance of becoming impaired or disabled before the age of retirement.

Main Digest

According to the Social Security Administration, a 20-year-old worker has a three in ten chance of becoming impaired or disabled before the age of retirement.

Throughout the course of an adult's working life, there is a possibility that the adult may face a serious health challenge, such as an illness, impairment or disability. When the illness, impairment or disability prevents a person from working, one may be eligible for benefits from the Social Security Administration.

According to the Social Security Administration, a 20-year-old worker has a three in ten chance of becoming impaired or disabled before the age of retirement. Many applicants for benefits are initially denied, but later successful upon appeal of the denial. It is important to understand the guidelines established by the Social Security Administration to evaluate applicants for disability benefits.

Eligibility for Social Security Disability Benefits

Not everyone who applies for Social Security Disability benefits will be approved. The Social Security Administration has strict approval guidelines. To qualify for benefits, an individual must meet both the technical and medical requirements.

To be eligible for Social Security Disability benefits, the applicant must have worked enough quarters and paid FICA taxes. The technical requirements for Social Security Disability benefits include the "recent work" and "duration of work" tests.

To meet the medical requirement for Social Security Disability benefits, the applicant must be suffering from a mental or physical condition that prevents them from working for at least one year. The Social Security administration does not pay for partial disability or short term disability. Conditions that may meet the medical requirements of Social Security Disability include Crohn's disease, Lupus, Parkinson's disease, and depression.

The Social Security Administration will review the applicant's medical records when determining eligibility for benefits. It is important to be in treatment and seeing a doctor regularly. The Social Security Administration may require the applicant to be seen by one of their doctors. The determination of benefits is also based on capacity to work, age, past work experience, and educational background.

The majority of applicants are denied Social Security Benefits. Once denied, the applicant has the right to appeal their claim. Many claimants are awarded benefits after appealing their Social Security Disability Denial. Representation by a Social Security attorney greatly increases a claimant's chances of being awarded Social Security Disability benefits.

Article provided by Berger and Green - Visit us at www.socialsecuritydisabilityfacts.com

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