Impact of Social Security Disability Income on Other Benefits

Author: Disabled World
Published: 2011/01/13 - Updated: 2022/07/02
Peer-Reviewed: N/A
Contents: Summary - Main - Related Publications

Synopsis: Examines differing requirements between Social Security programs, and how submitting multiple applications may impact eligibility. To qualify for benefits, a disability must significantly limit your ability to do the basic activities required for work. You must be not only unable to perform the type of work you did before becoming disabled but also be unable to perform other types of work. In most U.S. states, unemployment insurance is funded by an unemployment tax paid by employers. Eligibility requirements, the length of time, and the maximum amount of compensation an individual may collect are set by state law.

Social Security Disability Income
The Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) programs assist people with disabilities. The SSDI program pays benefits to you and certain family members if you are insured. This means you worked long enough and recently enough and paid Social Security taxes on your earnings. In comparison, the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program pays benefits to adults and children with disabilities who have limited income and resources.

Main Digest

Individuals unable to work may also be eligible for SSDI, veterans' benefits, and/or unemployment. Applicants should be aware of the different requirements between these programs.

If you cannot work, either because of a disability or the inability to find gainful employment, you may be entitled to one or more government benefits. You should pay particular attention to differing program requirements and understand how multiple submitting applications may impact eligibility.

Social Security Disability Income (SSDI)

SSDI provides monthly monetary assistance for those unable to work because of a medical condition that meets the definition of a disability, according to the Social Security Administration (SSA). The condition must be expected to prohibit you from working for at least one year.

To qualify for benefits, a disability must significantly limit your ability to do the basic activities required for work. You must be not only unable to perform the type of work you did before becoming disabled but also be unable to perform other types of work.

Another requirement for SSDI is that you need to have been in the workforce for a certain number of years. If you are over 31, this usually requires that you worked at least five out of the ten years before your disability.

The benefits you are entitled to receive depend on your average lifetime earnings. Certain family members and dependents may also be entitled to collect SSDI benefits.

It can take several months to evaluate an application for SSDI benefits. Often initial disability applications are denied. You can appeal this decision. An attorney can assist you with your SSDI appeal and advocate on your behalf to an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) why you should qualify for benefits.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

SSI provides monthly monetary assistance for those with limited financial resources, blind, disabled, or over age 65. Unlike SSDI benefits, SSI recipients do not have to meet a work history requirement. Under certain circumstances, you can receive both SSDI and SSI. You also have the right to appeal a denial of SSI benefits.

Veterans Benefits

The benefits available through the SSA are different from those available through the Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA). Two separate applications must be submitted. If approved, a veteran can receive benefits from both programs.

Different Disability Benefit Requirements between the SSA and DVA: - DVA disability benefits may be available if a veteran is at least 10% disabled. - SSDI benefits are only available if an applicant is 100% disabled. - DVA benefits are only available if the disability is "service-connected" (the injury must be linked to military service). - SSDI benefits are available to anyone who meets the eligibility requirements, regardless of how the disability occurred.

It is important to note that active duty status and receiving military pay do not limit eligibility for SSDI. Rather the actual work activity a veteran is engaged in is evaluated to determine eligibility.

The general application process for SSDI benefits for veterans is the same as for anyone else. However, veterans who were disabled in the line of duty on or after October 1, 2001, are entitled to expedited processing of their SSDI applications.

Unemployment Insurance

Unemployment insurance is a state-run insurance program that provides temporary compensation for those who are willing and able to work but who are unable to find full-time employment.

In most states, unemployment insurance is funded by an unemployment tax paid by employers. Eligibility requirements, the length of time, and the maximum amount of compensation an individual may collect are set by state law.

No specific rule prohibits an individual from collecting SSDI benefits simultaneously as unemployment benefits. The problem, however, is that the qualifications for each program are at odds with one another in most circumstances:

Occasionally, however, it may make sense for an individual to apply for both types of benefits. For instance, if you are not sure if you can hold a job, you may apply for both types of benefits. You then would drop one as soon as your disability status is established. Because the application process for disability, in particular, can be lengthy, this option makes sense for some individuals. It also protects your rights since the application dates are sometimes used for determining when benefits begin.

The receipt of unemployment benefits is one factor an ALJ may consider when deciding whether to award SSDI benefits. Thus, if an SSDI applicant has applied or is collecting unemployment benefits, it is best to prepare a reasonable explanation.

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Cite This Page (APA): Disabled World. (2011, January 13). Impact of Social Security Disability Income on Other Benefits. Disabled World. Retrieved February 22, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/disability/social-security/usa/impact.php

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