Rotenone and Paraquat Pesticides Associated with Parkinson's Disease

Author: NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
Published: 2011/02/14 - Updated: 2021/06/14
Contents: Summary - Main - Related Publications

Synopsis: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and National Institutes of Health study reveals link between rotenone and paraquat pesticides and Parkinson's disease. Use of rotenone as a pesticide to kill invasive fish species is currently the only allowable use of this pesticide. Paraquat use has long been restricted to certified applicators, largely due to concerns based on studies of animal models of Parkinson's disease.

Main Digest

NIH study finds 2 pesticides associated with Parkinson's disease - New research shows a link between use of two pesticides, rotenone and paraquat, and Parkinson's disease. People who used either pesticide developed Parkinson's disease approximately 2.5 times more often than non-users.

The study was a collaborative effort conducted by researchers at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), which is part of the National Institutes of Health, and the Parkinson's Institute and Clinical Center in Sunnyvale, Calif.

"Rotenone directly inhibits the function of the mitochondria, the structure responsible for making energy in the cell," said Freya Kamel, Ph.D., a researcher in the intramural program at NIEHS and co-author of the paper appearing online in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. "Paraquat increases production of certain oxygen derivatives that may harm cellular structures. People who used these pesticides or others with a similar mechanism of action were more likely to develop Parkinson's disease."

The authors studied 110 people with Parkinson's disease and 358 matched controls from the Farming and Movement Evaluation (FAME) Study (www.niehs.nih.gov/research/atniehs/labs/epi/studies/fame/index.cfm) to investigate the relationship between Parkinson's disease and exposure to pesticides or other agents that are toxic to nervous tissue. FAME is a case-control study that is part of the larger Agricultural Health Study (www.niehs.nih.gov/research/atniehs/labs/epi/studies/ahs/index.cfm), a study of farming and health in approximately 90,000 licensed pesticide applicators and their spouses. The investigators diagnosed Parkinson's disease by agreement of movement disorder specialists and assessed the lifelong use of pesticides using detailed interviews.

There are no home garden or residential uses for either paraquat or rotenone currently registered. Paraquat use has long been restricted to certified applicators, largely due to concerns based on studies of animal models of Parkinson's disease. Use of rotenone as a pesticide to kill invasive fish species is currently the only allowable use of this pesticide.

"These findings help us to understand the biologic changes underlying Parkinson's disease. This may have important implications for the treatment and ultimately the prevention of Parkinson's disease," said Caroline Tanner, M.D., Ph.D., clinical research director of the Parkinson's Institute and Clinical Center, and lead author of the article.

References:

Tanner CM, Kamel F, Ross GW, Hoppin JA, Goldman SM, Korell M, Marras C, Bhudhikanok GS, Kasten M, Chade AR, Comyns K, Richards MB, Meng C, Priestly B, Fernandez HH, Cambi F, Umbach DM, Blair A, Sandler DP, Langston JW. 2011. Rotenone, paraquat and Parkinson's disease. Environ Health Perspect; doi:10.1289/ehp.1002839 [Online 26 January 2011].

The NIEHS supports research to understand the effects of the environment on human health and is part of NIH. For more information on environmental health topics.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) "The Nation's Medical Research Agency" includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases.

Link Between Pesticides and Parkinson's Disease: Pesticides and Parkinson's: UCLA researchers uncover further proof of a link - Study suggests potential new target in fight against debilitating disease.

Attribution/Source(s):

This quality-reviewed publication pertaining to our Parkinson's Disease (PD) section was selected for circulation by the editors of Disabled World due to its likely interest to our disability community readers. Though the content may have been edited for style, clarity, or length, the article "Rotenone and Paraquat Pesticides Associated with Parkinson's Disease" was originally written by NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and submitted for publishing on 2011/02/14 (Edit Update: 2021/06/14). Should you require further information or clarification, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences can be contacted at the niehs.nih.gov website. Disabled World makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith.

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Cite This Page (APA): NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. (2011, February 14). Rotenone and Paraquat Pesticides Associated with Parkinson's Disease. Disabled World. Retrieved April 16, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/disability/types/mobility/parkinsons-disease/pesticides.php

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