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Lack of Mental Health Care in Prisons

Author: University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston(i) : Contact: Hannah Rhodes - Hannah.C.Rasorrhodes@uth.tmc.edu

Published: 2015-01-12 : (Rev. 2020-03-17)

Synopsis:

Research shows state and federal prisoners are not receiving treatment for mental health conditions.

Key Points:

Main Digest

A significant portion of state and federal prisoners are not receiving treatment for mental health conditions, according to research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health. The study was published recently in the American Journal of Public Health.

Mental health disorders among prisoners have consistently exceeded rates of disorders in the general population. Twenty six percent of prisoners reported a mental health diagnosis in the study, compared to 18 percent in the general population in 2012, according to the National Institutes of Health.

State and federal courts mandate that inmates must have access to adequate health services in prison. However, that mandate usually covers only "severe or serious" mental illnesses, according to the paper.

"Individuals with untreated mental health conditions may be at higher risk for correctional rehabilitation treatment failure and future recidivism - tendency to relapse into a previous condition or mode of behavior - after release from prison," said Jennifer Reingle, Ph.D., principal investigator and assistant professor in the Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences at UTHealth School of Public Health Dallas Regional Campus.

Jennifer Reingle, Ph.D., studied the mental health care of state and federal prisoners. Photo Credit UTHealth School of Public Health
Jennifer Reingle, Ph.D., studied the mental health care of state and federal prisoners. Photo Credit UTHealth School of Public Health

Data was obtained from a 2004 national sample of state and federal prisoners, which included 14,499 participants in state prisons and 3,686 in federal prisons:

"Screening tools are not consistent across prisons and inmates could be diagnosed with different conditions or not diagnosed at all when they get transferred to a new location," said Reingle. "A standardized mental health screening process could benefit the inmates and the prison system as a whole."

This study also found evidence of racial disparities in medication continuity:

In the study, researchers concluded that of the participants who were taking medication for a mental health condition in prison, 61 percent used no other form of treatment. A more holistic, multidimensional approach to treatment, such as counseling or group therapy, may lead to better outcomes and lower recidivism rates in this population, said Reingle.

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(i)Source/Reference: University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Disabled World makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith. Content may have been edited for style, clarity or length.

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