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Is a Brace Necessary for Spinal Fractures

Published : 2014-12-03 - Updated : 2020-11-14
Author : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons - Contact: Lauren Pearson Riley | pearson@aaos.org

🛈 Synopsis : Study reveals patients with spinal compression fractures who wore no brace fared as well as patients instructed to wear a brace for treatment. Many patients with these fractures are instructed to wear a soft or rigid brace to stabilize the spine with the intent of reducing pain and preventing further deterioration and collapse of the fracture site. In addition to the cost and discomfort associated with braces, the findings in this study suggest that brace treatment for osteoporotic compression fractures may not provide any additional improvement in fracture healing, mobility and pain.

Main Digest

Compression fractures in the spine due to osteoporosis, a common condition causing progressive bone loss and increased fracture risk, are especially common in older women. A new study appearing in the December 3rd issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS) found that patients who wore a brace as treatment for a spinal compression fracture had comparable outcomes in terms of pain, function and healing when compared to patients who did not wear a brace.

Nearly 700,000 men and women suffer from a spinal compression fracture each year. These fractures, which for the most part are stable fractures occurring on the front or anterior of the spine, are nearly twice as common as other fractures typically linked to osteoporosis such as broken hips and wrists. Women are at greater risk with more than 30 percent age 70 or older suffering at least one osteoporosis-related spinal fracture.

Many patients with these fractures are instructed to wear a soft or rigid brace to stabilize the spine with the intent of reducing pain and preventing further deterioration and collapse of the fracture site. However, patients often find the braces uncomfortable, and as a result, do not wear the braces consistently. In addition, prolonged use may result in muscular atrophy (muscle deterioration due to lack of use), de-conditioning, skin irritation, as well as additional costs and delays in rehabilitation.

In a Korean study, 60 patients (age 65 and older) with acute osteoporotic compression fractures were randomly assigned within three days of injury to wear a soft brace, a rigid brace or no brace. Outcomes then were measured at 12 weeks using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scoring, a common method for determining levels of pain and mobility in orthopaedic patients.

The mean adjusted ODI scores in the no brace and soft brace groups were 35.95 and 37.83, respectively. Similarly, the mean adjusted ODI score in the no brace and rigid brace groups were 35.95 and 33.54, respectively. In addition:

"In addition to the cost and discomfort associated with braces, the findings in this study suggest that brace treatment for osteoporotic compression fractures may not provide any additional improvement in fracture healing, mobility and pain," said Ho-Joong Kim, MD, PhD, orthopaedic surgeon and assistant professor, Seoul National University College of Medicine.

"Moreover, the gradual deterioration in life quality, including mental and social wellbeing, associated with this condition reemphasizes the need for prevention of osteoporotic compression and other fractures," said Dr. Kim.

Study Details

Disclosure:

One or more of the authors received payments or services, either directory or indirectly (i.e., via his or her institution), from a third party in support of an aspect of this work. None of the authors, or their institution(s), have had any financial relationship in the 36 months prior to submission of this work, with any entity in the biomedical area that could be perceived to influence or have the potential to influence what is written in this work. In addition, no author has had any other relationships, or has engaged in any other activities, that could be perceived to influence or have the potential to influence what is written in this work.

Source/Reference: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (Lauren Pearson Riley | pearson@aaos.org). Disabled World makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith. Content may have been edited for style, clarity or length.

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Cite Page: Journal: Disabled World. Language: English (U.S.). Author: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Electronic Publication Date: 2014-12-03 - Revised: 2020-11-14. Title: Is a Brace Necessary for Spinal Fractures, Source: <a href=https://www.disabled-world.com/disability/types/spinal/brace.php>Is a Brace Necessary for Spinal Fractures</a>. Retrieved 2021-04-12, from https://www.disabled-world.com/disability/types/spinal/brace.php - Reference: DW#248-10938.