Eating Half an Avocado with Lunch Reduces Hunger Cravings

Author: Hass Avocado Board
Published: 2014/01/11 - Updated: 2024/02/17
Publication Type: Informative - Peer-Reviewed: Yes
Contents: Summary - Main - Related Publications

Synopsis: Study explores relationship between avocado consumption, appetite satiety and blood sugar levels. Fresh Hass avocados have 3 grams of total carbohydrate, less than 1 gram of natural sugar per one ounce serving and contribute 8% of the daily value (DV) for fiber. Clinical studies are underway to investigate relationship between avocado consumption and risk factors for heart disease, diabetes, support of weight management and healthy living.

Main Digest

New research published in the November issue of Nutrition Journal reports adding one-half of a fresh avocado to a lunch may have helped healthy, overweight people feel more satisfied and reduced their desire to eat following a meal. The study was funded by the Hass Avocado Board.

The pilot study, "A Randomized 3x3 Crossover Study to Evaluate the Effect of Hass Avocado Intake on Post Ingestive Satiety, Glucose and Insulin Levels, and Subsequent Energy Intake in Overweight Adults ," compared the effects of incorporating fresh Hass avocado into a lunch - either by replacing other foods or by simply adding it to the meal - to the effects of eating a standard lunch to determine how avocado consumption would influence satiety, blood sugar and insulin response and subsequent food intake. The subjects were 26 healthy, overweight adults.

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Image depicts a number of green whole avocados.
Image depicts a number of green whole avocados.
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Researchers found that participants who added half of a fresh avocado to their lunch reported a significantly decreased desire to eat by 40 percent over a three-hour period, and by 28 percent over a five-hour period after the meal, compared to their desire to eat after a standard lunch without avocado. In addition, they reported increased feelings of satisfaction by 26 percent over the three hours following the meal.

"Satiety is an important factor in weight management, because people who feel satisfied are less likely to snack between meals," said Joan Sabate, MD, DrPH, Chair of the Department of Nutrition who led the research team at Loma Linda University.

"We also noted that though adding avocados increased participants' calorie and carbohydrate intake at lunch, there was no increase in blood sugar levels beyond what was observed after eating the standard lunch. This leads us to believe that avocados potential role in blood sugar management is worth further investigation."

While the findings were generally positive, more research is needed to determine whether the conclusions drawn from this study can be applied to the general public. However, the results do provide promising clues and a basis for future research to determine avocados' effect on satiety, glucose and insulin response.

"These research findings provide support for the emerging benefits of avocados," said Nikki Ford, PhD, Director of Nutrition at the Hass Avocado Board (HAB).

"These results further complement our research efforts in weight management and diabetes as well as our continued work to explore the many benefits that fresh avocados have to offer when consumed in everyday healthy eating plans."

Fresh Hass avocados have 3 grams of total carbohydrate, less than 1 gram of natural sugar per one ounce serving (the least amount of sugar per serving than any other fresh fruit) and contribute 8% of the daily value (DV) for fiber. Each serving of nutrient dense fresh avocado is also a source of naturally good fats.

The research at Loma Linda University is one of several studies supported by HAB as part of a research program established in 2010 to increase awareness and improve understanding of the unique benefits of avocados to human health and nutrition.

Clinical studies are currently underway to investigate the relationship between avocado consumption and risk factors for heart disease, diabetes, support of weight management and healthy living.

As part of its commitment to supporting research, HAB recently launched a science-based food and wellness education program, called Love One Today. This program encourages consumers to include fresh Hass Avocados in everyday healthy eating plans to help increase fruit and vegetable intake and as a delicious, cholesterol-free, whole food source of naturally good fats.

Attribution/Source(s):

This peer reviewed publication pertaining to our Fruits and Vegetables section was selected for circulation by the editors of Disabled World due to its likely interest to our disability community readers. Though the content may have been edited for style, clarity, or length, the article "Eating Half an Avocado with Lunch Reduces Hunger Cravings" was originally written by Hass Avocado Board, and submitted for publishing on 2014/01/11 (Edit Update: 2024/02/17). Should you require further information or clarification, Hass Avocado Board can be contacted at hassavocadoboard.com. Disabled World makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith.

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Cite This Page (APA): Hass Avocado Board. (2014, January 11). Eating Half an Avocado with Lunch Reduces Hunger Cravings. Disabled World. Retrieved February 21, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/fitness/nutrition/fruits-veggies/avocado.php

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