Skip to main content

Hope on the Horizon for Alzheimer's Patients and Caregivers

  • Synopsis: Published: 2010-11-21 - New medicines in the pipeline for Alzheimers disease and other dementias - USF Health's Byrd Alzheimer's Institute.

Main Document

USF Health Byrd Alzheimer's Institute researchers to discuss latest advances, including new medications in the pipeline.

America's biopharmaceutical research companies highlighted the 98 new medicines in the pipeline for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, either in clinical trials or awaiting FDA review. Researchers, patients, caregivers, advocacy groups and students gathered at the University of South Florida Health Byrd Alzheimer's Institute to discuss the newest advances in Alzheimer's research and to take a look into the future of this debilitating disease. Currently, there are only five medicines approved for Alzheimer's. While these medicines temporarily reduce the symptoms for some patients, biopharmaceutical companies are working to develop new medicines to prevent, delay or cure Alzheimer's.

"The American biomedical enterprise is making progress in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease," said Dr. David Morgan, CEO of the Institute. "The richness of the public-private partnerships between universities, research institutes, biotechnology companies and major biopharmaceutical companies is the envy of the world."

Research facilities, like the USF Health Byrd Alzheimer's Institute are making breakthroughs with this devastating disease. These advances have expedited the understanding of the causes of Alzheimer's. New imaging technologies, such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans, provide scientists a glimpse into the brain, overcoming the prior inability to access brain tissue. PET scans and other biomarkers are revealing the earliest signs of Alzheimer's even before symptoms appear.

The Honorable Johnnie Byrd, Jr., founder and board member of the Institute highlights the importance of the research conducted at the Institute and the economic impact of the disease.

"As of 2010, the estimated total cost of caring for Alzheimer's patients is $172 billion, including Medicare, private insurance, out-of-pocket costs and uncompensated care. Families drain their life savings and lose their homes paying for care," stated Mr. Byrd.

Today, more than five million Americans are living with dementia, and one in 40 Floridians has dementia. Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia, has become the seventh leading cause of death in America, and is the only cause of death that is moving up in the rankings. Alzheimer's is a disease of aging, with typical onset in the late 70s and 80s. The number of Americans living with Alzheimer's is expected to increase as the baby boomers age, and people live longer due to advances in treating infections, heart disease and cancer. It is estimated that 10 million baby boomers will die of this disease without a treatment that slows or prevents Alzheimer's.

For more information on USF Health's Byrd Alzheimer's Institute, visit health.usf.edu/nocms/byrd



Information from our Alzheimer's Disease: Facts & Research Information section - (Full List).

E-Newsletter

Loan Information for low income singles, families, seniors and disabled. Includes home, vehicle and personal loans.


Famous People with Disabilities - Well known people with disabilities and conditions who contributed to society.


List of awareness ribbon colors and their meaning. Also see our calendar of awareness dates.


Blood Pressure Chart - What should your blood pressure be. Also see information on blood group types and compatibility.


  1. Majority in Favor of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) Screening
  2. When the Spinal Cord Takes Charge of Information Related to Movement
  3. Sign Language Comparative List of Astronomical Words
  4. Israeli President Honors Special Education Teachers




Citation



Errors: Disabled World is an independent website, your assistance in reporting outdated or inaccurate information is appreciated. If you find an error please let us know.

Disclaimer: Content on Disabled World is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. See our Terms of Service for more information.