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Symptom Relief in MS Patients Seen by Interventional Radiologists

Published: 2012-03-27 - Updated: 2022-04-09
Author: Society of Interventional Radiology | Contact: sirweb.org
Peer-Reviewed Publication: N/A

Synopsis: Minimally invasive endovascular treatment for CCSVI may produce significant improvement in physical and mental quality of life in individuals with MS. Researchers who investigated the connection between chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency and multiple sclerosis indicate that a minimally invasive endovascular treatment for CCSVI, is safe and may produce "significant," short-term improvement in physical- and mental health-related quality of life in individuals with MS. An estimated 400,000 people in the United States with MS - generally thought of as an incurable, disabling neurologic disease - may find hope that symptom relief is possible. MS is typically treated with disease-modifying drugs, which modulate or suppress the immune response believed to be central to the progression of the disease.

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Main Digest

Short-term follow-up supports evidence that angioplasty of azygos and jugular veins safe, improves quality of life for those with Multiple Sclerosis, say researchers at Society of Interventional Radiology's 37th annual scientific meeting.

This article is part our digest of 50 publications relating to Multiple Sclerosis (MS) that include:

Researchers who investigated the connection between chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (a reported condition characterized as a blockage in the veins that drain blood from the brain and spinal cord and returns it to the heart) and multiple sclerosis indicate that a minimally invasive endovascular treatment for CCSVI, is safe and may produce "significant," short-term improvement in physical- and mental health-related quality of life in individuals with MS. These findings were presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 37th Annual Scientific Meeting in San Francisco, Calif.

An estimated 400,000 people in the United States with MS - generally thought of as an incurable, disabling neurologic disease - may find hope that symptom relief is possible. MS is typically treated with disease-modifying drugs, which modulate or suppress the immune response believed to be central to the progression of the disease.

"Traditional theories surrounding treatment for multiple sclerosis in large part focus on autoimmune causes for brain pathology and neurologic symptoms. Based on this, treatment has been predominantly medications by mouth or injection," stated Kenneth Mandato, M.D., an interventional radiologist at Albany Medical Center in Albany, N.Y.

"Interventional radiologists, pioneers in the field of minimally invasive therapies, have been performing an endovascular therapy called angioplasty for years, to treat blocked or narrowed arteries and veins. We have been using angioplasty to open jugular and azygos veins in the neck and chest respectively to improve blood flow in people with MS. On follow-up, we have seen many of these individuals report significant symptom relief," he added.

Classifications within a diagnosis of MS include:

MS subtypes within the Albany study group included 96 individuals with relapsing remitting, 66 with secondary progressive and 30 with primary progressive. The study population included those who underwent angioplasty alone and three who underwent angioplasty with a stent (a tiny mesh tube used to hold the vessel open) placement.

"Results of the study were quite exciting and promising," stated Mandato. "We can attest to significant physical improvements reported in greater than 75 percent of those with relapsing remitting and primary progressive forms of multiple sclerosis. Additionally, mental health scores improved in greater than 70 percent of individuals studied. People with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis showed statistically significant improvements in both physical and mental health scores at 59 percent and 50 percent, respectively," he added.

"During a four-month period, we treated 213 individuals. One hundred ninety-two of these patients (72 men, 141 women; average age 49 years) responded to a standard questionnaire that evaluated key quality of life components including changes in physical abilities, health perception, energy/fatigue, sexual function, emotional well-being, cognition and pain," explained Meridith J. Englander, M.D., also an interventional radiologist at Albany Medical Center and one of the study's co-authors.

"We ultimately broke this data down into physical and mental health scores for each person, and found improvement in both components of quality of life," she added. "In addition, we found a trend that patients undergoing this treatment more than 10 years after diagnosis did not respond as well as those with a more recent diagnosis."

"To address the needs and concerns of those with MS who feel they cannot wait until definitive studies are completed, many doctors are currently offering treatments with the hope of helping individuals with hard-to-manage symptoms of MS," said Mandato. "Physicians who perform these treatments hope that this work will provide insights into the design of a prospective, randomized trial that is needed to rigorously evaluate the role of this treatment in MS," he added

"As we are still early in fully understanding the condition and its relation to treatment of CCSVI, it is our hope that future double-blinded prospective studies will be performed to further assess the durability of these results," said Mandato.

Interventional radiologists are vascular specialists who pioneered venous angioplasty and stenting and are highly qualified to perform such treatments when appropriately indicated. IR physicians have the expertise in the endovascular techniques central to this novel treatment. The Society of Interventional Radiology encourages and supports research protocols to evaluate the appropriate role of this therapy in the treatment of MS.

"Short-Term Outcomes After Endovascular Treatment for Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI) in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis," K.P. Sekhar, K. Mandato, W. Rucker, M. Chappidi, M. Englander, G. Siskin, Radiology, Albany Medical Center, Albany, N.Y.

Primary Information Source(s):

Symptom Relief in MS Patients Seen by Interventional Radiologists | Society of Interventional Radiology (sirweb.org). Disabled World makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith. Content may have been edited for style, clarity or length.

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Cite This Page (APA): Society of Interventional Radiology. (2012, March 27). Symptom Relief in MS Patients Seen by Interventional Radiologists. Disabled World. Retrieved August 10, 2022 from www.disabled-world.com/health/autoimmunediseases/ms/symptom-relief.php

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