Glioblastoma Brain Tumor: General Overview

Ian C. Langtree Content Writer/Editor for Disabled World
Published: 2009/04/02 - Updated: 2023/01/28
Contents: Summary - Main - Related Publications

Synopsis: Glioblastoma Multiforme is a fast-growing type of central nervous system tumor that forms from glial tissue of the brain and spinal cord. Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is composed of glial (supportive) brain cells that grow, divide and spread aggressively throughout the brain tissue, having lost their control mechanisms. Consequently, these tumors are difficult to treat and often recur after initial therapy. The symptoms of glioblastoma multiforme may include: frequent headaches, vomiting, loss of appetite, changes in mood and personality, changes in ability to think and learn and seizures.

Glioblastoma

Glioblastoma, previously known as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is one of the most aggressive types of cancer that begin within the brain or spinal cord. Glioblastoma forms from cells called astrocytes that support nerve cells. Initially, signs and symptoms of glioblastoma are nonspecific. They may include headaches, personality changes, nausea, and symptoms similar to those of a stroke. Glioblastoma can occur at any age but tends to occur more often in older adults. Symptoms often worsen rapidly and may progress to unconsciousness.

Main Digest

Glioblastoma Multiforme is a fast-growing type of central nervous system tumor that forms from the brain and spinal cord's glial (supportive) tissue and has cells that look very different from normal cells.

Alternate Names: Grades III and IV Astrocytoma, malignant glioma, anaplastic glioma, brain cancer, adult brain tumor, GBM.

The U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) has included Glioblastoma Multiforme (Brain Tumor) as a Compassionate Allowance to expedite a disability claim.

Glioblastoma multiforme or grade IV astrocytoma is the most malignant of the primary brain tumors.

GBM is composed of glial (supportive) brain cells that grow, divide and spread aggressively throughout the brain tissue, having lost their control mechanisms. Consequently, these tumors are difficult to treat and often recur after initial therapy.

Glioblastoma multiforme most often occurs in adults between the ages of 45 and 70 years and affects the brain more often than the spinal cord.

The symptoms of glioblastoma multiforme may include; frequent headaches, vomiting, loss of appetite, changes in mood and personality, changes in the ability to think and learn, and seizures.

Diagnosis is based on patient history, neurological examination, and diagnostic procedures. The only definitive test that can provide a diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme is a biopsy of the tumor.

Testing to confirm the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme includes neuroimaging (CT and MRI) to provide information about the tumor's location, size, and shape.

Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme may include the following: surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.

Glioblastoma multiforme is highly aggressive, infiltrating, and responds poorly to all currently available treatments. The prognosis is grim as most patients die within two years, and few survive longer than three years.

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Cite This Page (APA): Langtree, I. C. (2009, April 2). Glioblastoma Brain Tumor: General Overview. Disabled World. Retrieved April 17, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/health/cancer/brain/glioblastoma-multiforme.php

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