Screen Readers Skip to Content
🖶 Print page

Cardiovascular Disease: Information, News and Research

Updated/Revised Date: 2022-04-11
Author: Disabled World | Contact: Disabled World (Disabled-World.com)
Additional References: Cardiovascular Publications

Synopsis: Information on cardiovascular diseases, defined as diseases that involve the heart or blood vessels of the human body. Cardiovascular disease is the number one health problem in Western society. It is the leading cause of death for over one million people each year in the United States. These problems include heart attacks, strokes, arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, ischemia, hypertension, angina, and other dysfunctions.

advertisements

Main Document

What are Cardiovascular Diseases?

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a class of diseases that involve the heart or blood vessels. Common CVDs include: ischemic heart disease (IHD), stroke, hypertensive heart disease, rheumatic heart disease (RHD), aortic aneurysms, cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation, congenital heart disease, endocarditis, and peripheral artery disease (PAD), among others. Cardiovascular disease is currently the number one cause of death and disability in the United States and most European countries.

A definition of cardiovascular disease doesn't include an age. In fact, early signs of cardiovascular disease have been noted during surgeries performed on young soldiers wounded in battle. It has been estimated that plaque build-up was seen in the arteries of nearly 90% of the troops wounded in Vietnam. That's pretty spectacular when one considers that these soldiers were in their teens and early twenties. So, we need to take a good look at exactly what cardiovascular disease is, what causes it, and how we can prevent it.

The term 'cardiovascular disease' is used to cover a group of problems related to the heart or the body's overall circulatory system. These issues include heart attacks, strokes, arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, ischemia, hypertension, angina, and other dysfunctions.

Cardiovascular disease is the number one health concern in Western society. It is the leading cause of death for over one million people each year in the United States. It is estimated that over 50 million Americans currently have cardiovascular disease, although many will not know it because they have no symptoms yet. In fact, 25% of the people who have heart attacks had no symptoms before the incident.

Fig. 1 - Labeled diagram showing veins and arteries of the human circulatory system.
Fig. 1 - Labeled diagram showing veins and arteries of the human circulatory system.

Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease

If you answered yes to one or more of the above, you should talk to your doctor about how you can reduce your risk through lifestyle modifications. Your doctor will determine if preventative therapies such as ASPIRIN 81 mg are right for you. Following cigarette smoking, the major factor that contributes to heart disease is one's diet. There are several dietary changes that can help prevent the onset of heart disease:

The best changes to make for preventing heart disease are:

Symptoms of a Heart Attack Can Include:

Symptoms of a Stroke

The brain requires unobstructed blood flow to nourish its many functions. Very high, sustained blood pressure will eventually cause blood vessels to weaken. Over time, these weaken vessels can break, and blood will leak into the brain. The area of the brain that is being fed by these broken vessels start to die, and this will cause a stroke. Additionally, if a blot clot blocks a narrowed artery, blood ceases to flow and a stroke will occur.

Symptoms of a stroke include sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body, confusion, trouble speaking, or seeing, sudden severe headache. Often, there are no symptoms of the underlying disease of the blood vessels. A heart attack or stroke may be the first warning of underlying disease. Common symptoms of a stroke can include:

Other symptoms include sudden onset of:

Symptoms of rheumatic heart disease include:

Symptoms of rheumatic fever include:

If you or someone with you has one or more of these signs, don't delay, call 911.

Common Heart Disease Terms

By the time that heart problems are detected, the underlying cause (atherosclerosis) is usually quite advanced, having progressed for decades. There is therefore increased emphasis on preventing atherosclerosis by modifying risk factors, such as healthy eating, exercise and avoidance of smoking.

Post to Twitter Add to Facebook

Subtopics and Associated Subjects


Latest Cardiovascular Publications

Blood pressure should be measured in both arms, and the higher reading should be adopted to improve hypertension diagnosis and management.
Publish Date: 2022-08-04

U.S. nationwide survey provides insights into knowledge gaps, limited physician guidance and gender disparities, when it comes to heart disease.
Publish Date: 2019-02-19
Deep Forehead Wrinkles Could be Sign of Heart Disease thumbnail image.
Research presented showed people with lots of deep forehead wrinkles, more than is typical for their age, may have higher risk of dying of cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Publish Date: 2018-09-03
Eating at Night, Sleeping By Day Alters Key Blood Proteins thumbnail image.
Research shows staying awake all night and sleeping all day for just a few days can disrupt levels and time of day patterns of more than 100 proteins in the blood.
Publish Date: 2018-05-25 - Updated: 2019-12-29

Additional Cardiovascular Publications

Disabled World is an independent disability community founded in 2004 to provide disability news and information to people with disabilities, seniors, their family and/or carers. See our homepage for informative reviews, exclusive stories and how-tos. You can connect with us on social media such as Twitter and Facebook or learn more about Disabled World on our about us page.

Disabled World provides general information only. The materials presented are never meant to substitute for professional medical care by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such. Financial support is derived from advertisements or referral programs, where indicated. Any 3rd party offering or advertising does not constitute an endorsement.


Cite This Page (APA): Disabled World. (2022, April 11). Cardiovascular Disease: Information, News and Research. Disabled World. Retrieved February 8, 2023 from www.disabled-world.com/health/cardiovascular/

Permalink: <a href="https://www.disabled-world.com/health/cardiovascular/">Cardiovascular Disease: Information, News and Research</a>