Skip to main content
Accessibility|Contact|Privacy|Terms|Cookies

Cholesterol Tips for American Heart Month

  • Published: 2010-02-12 (Revised/Updated 2015-04-19) : Author: American Egg Board
  • Synopsis: Enjoying an egg or two a day can fall within current blood cholesterol guidelines.

Quote: "Hard-Cooked Eggs - Make a dozen hard-cooked eggs on Sunday for a simple grab-and-go solution for breakfast, lunch or a snack all week."

Main Document

Cracking Cholesterol Confusion During American Heart Month - Registered Dietitian Keith Ayoob Dispels Myths Surrounding Eggs and Cholesterol...

February is American Heart Month, which means it's time to raise awareness about cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in America. When it comes to diet, mixed messages about dietary cholesterol can be confusing for many Americans, especially when it comes to eating eggs. But egg lovers still have a reason to celebrate during American Heart Month - and all year long - because more than 30 years of research shows healthy adults can enjoy eggs without significantly impacting their risk of heart disease.(i)

The myth about the link between eating eggs and their effect on blood cholesterol has been a hard shell to crack and a topic registered dietitian Keith Ayoob, Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the director of the Nutrition Clinic at the Rose F. Kennedy Children's Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, often addresses with his clients. When it comes to assessing the risk of heart disease, the ratio of "bad" LDL-cholesterol to "good" HDL-cholesterol is one of the best known and proven indicators.

"It's important that we clear up all the confusion that surrounds what people should or shouldn't eat to reduce their risk of heart disease," says Ayoob. "Egg consumption does not significantly impact the LDL:HDL ratio, so enjoying an egg or two a day can fall within current cholesterol guidelines, particularly if you eat lower-cholesterol, nutrient-rich foods throughout the rest of the day, like fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy."

More Reasons to Love Eggs - Along with being affordable - only 15 cents apiece (ii) - Ayoob offers the following benefits of adding eggs to your diet:

Jump-start your breakfast routine during American Heart Month and save time in the morning and all year long with these quick and easy suggestions from Ayoob:

For more information on the benefits of eggs and egg breakfast recipes, visit www.IncredibleEgg.org.

About the American Egg Board (AEB) - AEB is the U.S. egg producer's link to the consumer in communicating the value of The incredible edible egg and is funded from a national legislative checkoff on all egg production from companies with greater than 75,000 layers, in the continental United States. The board consists of 18 members and 18 alternates from all regions of the country who are appointed by the Secretary of Agriculture. The AEB staff carries out the programs under the board direction. AEB is located in Park Ridge, Ill. Visit www.IncredibleEgg.org for more information.

About the Egg Nutrition Center (ENC) - The Egg Nutrition Center (ENC) is the health education and research center of the American Egg Board. Established in 1979, ENC provides science-based information to health promotion agencies, physicians, dietitians, nutritional scientists, media and consumers on issues related to egg nutrition and the role of eggs in the American diet. Visit www.enc-online.org for more information.

(i) Lee A and B Griffin. 2006. Dietary cholesterol, eggs and coronary heart disease risk in perspective. Nutrition Bulletin (British Nutrition Foundation). 31:21-27.

(ii) United States Agricultural Department, Economic Research Service. January 15, 2010.

(iii) US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, 2009. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 22. Online. Available at: Nutrient Data Laboratory Home Page, www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htmmodecode=12-35-45-00. Accessed January 21, 2010.

(iv) Leidy HJ, et al. Increased dietary protein consumed at breakfast leads to an initial and sustained feeling of fullness during energy restriction compared to other meals. British Journal of Nutrition, 101:798-803.

Discussion

• Have your say! Add your comment or discuss this article on our FaceBook Page.

Similar Topics

1 : How Low Should LDL Cholesterol Go with Statin Therapy? : Brigham and Women's Hospital.
2 : Efficacy of Statins Exaggerated : University of South Florida (USF Health).
3 : Asymptomatic Atherosclerosis and Cognitive Disability Link : Radiological Society of North America.
4 : New Cholesterol Guidelines Reveal Most Seniors Qualify for Statin Therapy : Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation.
5 : Blood Cholesterol Statin Medications: New Guidelines : Disabled World.
From our Blood Cholesterol section - Full List (14 Items)


Submit disability news, coming events, as well as assistive technology product news and reviews.


Loan Information for low income singles, families, seniors and disabled. Includes home, vehicle and personal loans.


Famous People with Disabilities - Well known people with disabilities and conditions who contributed to society.


List of awareness ribbon colors and their meaning. Also see our calendar of awareness dates.


Blood Pressure Chart - What should your blood pressure be, and information on blood group types/compatibility.





1 : Turnstone Center Designated as Official Paralympic Training Site by US Olympic Committee
2 : Help Your Child in School by Adding Language to The Math
3 : 50% of Retirees Saw Little or No COLA Increase in Net 2018 Social Security Benefits
4 : Turnstone Endeavor Games Concludes with National Records Broken
5 : Spinning in Circles and Learning From Myself by Tsara Shelton
6 : St. Louis HELP Medical Equipment Donation Drive Generates Record-Breaking Results
7 : People Who Snore Suffer from Palate Nerve and Muscle Damage
8 : How Our Ancestors with Autistic Traits Led a Revolution in Ice Age Art


Disclaimer: This site does not employ and is not overseen by medical professionals. Content on Disabled World is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. See our Terms of Service for more information.

Reporting Errors: Disabled World is an independent website, your assistance in reporting outdated or inaccurate information is appreciated. If you find an error please let us know.

© 2004 - 2018 Disabled World™