UV Nail Lamps Safe for Skin, According to CND

Skin Conditions

Author: CND
Published: 2010/06/03
Contents: Summary - Introduction - Main - Related

Synopsis: Energy from a UV lamp during a nail service roughly equivalent to UV exposure experienced during full day of exposure in indoor fluorescent lighting.

Introduction

From commanding a steering wheel in the car to working under fluorescent lights, hands get more UV exposure from natural and artificial light than any other part of the body.

Main Digest

Claims based on a study of two woman have surfaced that UV nail lamps can put users at risk for skin cancer. According to extensive research by nail industry leader CND, UV light sources such as those used for curing nail products are safer than 8 hours in traditional office lighting. "The amount of energy from a UV lamp during a nail service is roughly equivalent to the amount of UV exposure one experiences during a typical full day of exposure in indoor fluorescent lighting," explains Dr. David Valia, Director of Research and Development for CND.

UV light sources such as those used for curing nail products emit UV energy at a very low level. Nail lamps emit a UV light at a very narrow section of the UVA region, while both indoor lighting and sunlight emit UV light across a much broader spectrum including UVA, UVB, and UVC. With tanning beds, the exposure is much higher due to a greater UV intensity, greater amount of energy transmitted by bulbs, longer exposure time and closer proximity of the user to the source.

Considering the minimal exposure of minutes drying nail color under a UV lamp versus the percentage of time spent unprotected in the sun or the office, the anxieties of getting skin damage from a manicure are disproportionate to the truth. How often does one reapply sunscreen after washing their hands? Seldom does anyone put on sunscreen when driving, or wear gloves when in the sun, but many wear hats, SPF-protective clothing and sunscreen.

CND has the world's largest laboratory for professional nail research and development, and utilizes state-of-the-art equipment to analyze UV output, equipment design, and health and safety. CND's knowledge in polymer science and expertise in UV technology is unparalleled. Participation in educational conferences including 'RadTech,' the largest event dedicated to the education, technical and scientific advancement of Ultra Violet (UV) and Electron Beam (EB) technologies, keeps CND at the forefront of this science. CND is dedicated to the advancement of safe and efficacious technologies, as illustrated with the recent Shellac Hybrid Nail Color innovation that is safe and convenient for women wanting long lasting manicures.

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Cite This Page (APA): CND. (2010, June 3). UV Nail Lamps Safe for Skin, According to CND. Disabled World. Retrieved July 20, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/health/dermatology/skin/uv-nail-lamps.php

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