Dry Scooping: A Potentially Deadly Practice

Eating Disorders

Author: University of Toronto
Published: 2023/02/08 - Peer-Reviewed: Yes
Contents: Summary - Definition - Introduction - Main - Related

Synopsis: Research reveals dry scooping is common mainly among adolescent boys and young adult men. The researchers also found that participants who engaged in weight training and spent greater time on social media were more likely to report dry scooping. We need health and mental health care providers to be knowledgeable of these unique dietary practices to increase performance and musculature, such as dry scooping.

Introduction

Prevalence and Correlates of Dry Scooping: Results from the Canadian Study of Adolescent Health Behaviors - Eating Behaviors.

A new study published in the journal Eating Behaviors has found that over 1 in 5 adolescent boys and young adult men have engaged in "dry scooping," a novel dietary phenomenon described as ingesting pre-workout powders without a liquid (i.e., the entire scoop in one shot without mixing with water as intended).

Main Digest

"Dry scooping can have serious health effects, including issues with inhalation, cardiac abnormalities, and digestive issues," says lead author Kyle T. Ganson, Ph.D., MSW, assistant professor at the University of Toronto's Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, "To date, however, there have been no epidemiological studies investigating the occurrence of dry scooping among young people, leaving significant information unknown."

Analyzing data from over 2,700 Canadian adolescents and young adults from the Canadian Study of Adolescent Health Behaviors, the researchers found that 17% of participants reported dry scooping at least once in the previous year, and an average of 50 times over that period. The researchers also found that participants who engaged in weight training and spent greater time on social media were more likely to report dry scooping.

"Our data shows that novel dietary phenomena that become popularized on social media and within gym culture can lead to a greater likelihood of engagement," Ganson continued. "We need to consider these risk factors as potential areas of prevention and intervention."

The study also showed that participants who displayed clinically significant symptoms of muscle dysmorphia, a mental health condition characterized as the pathological pursuit of muscularity, were more likely to report dry scooping. This finding underscores the potentially harmful behaviors one may engage in to achieve one's body ideal.

"We need health care and mental health care providers to be knowledgeable of these unique dietary practices aimed at increasing performance and musculature, such as dry scooping," says Ganson.

The researchers called for more investigation on this topic and prevention and intervention efforts, such as educating young people on the potential harms and lack of evidence of dry scooping.

Attribution/Source(s):

This peer reviewed publication was selected for publishing by the editors of Disabled World due to its significant relevance to the disability community. Originally authored by University of Toronto, and published on 2023/02/08, the content may have been edited for style, clarity, or brevity. For further details or clarifications, University of Toronto can be contacted at utoronto.ca. NOTE: Disabled World does not provide any warranties or endorsements related to this article.

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Cite This Page (APA): University of Toronto. (2023, February 8). Dry Scooping: A Potentially Deadly Practice. Disabled World. Retrieved July 20, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/health/eating-disorders/dry-scooping.php

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