Widespread Medication Use Among Pregnant Women

Author: Boston University Medical Center
Published: 2011/04/25 - Updated: 2022/04/15
Contents: Summary - Main - Related Publications

Synopsis: Researchers report widespread and increasing medication use among pregnant women. The results include information not only on use of prescription drugs but also OTC medications. Although a number of antenatal medication exposures are known to cause birth defects, there is insufficient information on the risks and safety for the vast majority of medications, whether they are obtained by prescription or over-the-counter (OTC). Not only is it critical to identify how many OTC and prescription medications are taken by pregnant women and what those specific medications are, but it is also important to know how use of medications changes over time.

Main Digest

Researchers from Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center, together with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Harvard School of Public Health, have reported widespread and increasing medication use among pregnant women.

The study, which currently appears online in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, also found that medication use varied by socioeconomic status, maternal age, race/ethnicity and state of residence.

Although a number of antenatal medication exposures are known to cause birth defects, there is insufficient information on the risks and safety for the vast majority of medications, whether they are obtained by prescription or over-the-counter (OTC). As a result, pregnant women may unknowingly take a medication that poses risk to their fetus; on the other hand, anxiety about the potential harmful effects to the fetus may discourage women from adhering to beneficial treatments.

The findings came from data collected by the Slone Epidemiology Center's Birth Defects Study (1976-2008) and the CDC's National Birth Defects Prevention Study (1997-2003), which together interviewed more than 30,000 women about their medication use during pregnancy.

The results included information not only on use of prescription drugs but also OTC medications, which are more commonly used and are not typically recorded in electronic medical/insurance records.

Outline of the Study's Findings:

During the first trimester of pregnancy:

Over the last 30 years:

In addition, this study reported that:

According to the researchers, defining research priorities requires an understanding of patterns and factors associated with actual use of the wide range of specific medications that are taken during pregnancy and particularly during the first trimester, when concerns about development of birth defects are greatest.

"These data identify prescription medications that are currently most commonly used and therefore urgently require research on their risks and safety; they also reinforce the need for ongoing surveillance regarding medication use in pregnancy and its consequences," said lead author Allen A. Mitchell, MD, director of BU's Slone Epidemiology Center. "Not only is it critical to identify how many OTC and prescription medications are taken by pregnant women and what those specific medications are, but it is also important to know how use of medications changes over time," he added.

This study was supported in part by a Cooperative Agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, cooperative agreements from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the centers participating in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Attribution/Source(s):

This quality-reviewed publication pertaining to our Pregnancy Information section was selected for circulation by the editors of Disabled World due to its likely interest to our disability community readers. Though the content may have been edited for style, clarity, or length, the article "Widespread Medication Use Among Pregnant Women" was originally written by Boston University Medical Center, and submitted for publishing on 2011/04/25 (Edit Update: 2022/04/15). Should you require further information or clarification, Boston University Medical Center can be contacted at the bumc.bu.edu website. Disabled World makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith.

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Cite This Page (APA): Boston University Medical Center. (2011, April 25). Widespread Medication Use Among Pregnant Women. Disabled World. Retrieved April 16, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/health/female/pregnancy/medication-use.php

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