Number of Autistic People in England May Be Double Previously Reported

Autism Information

Author: University College London
Published: 2023/06/26 - Updated: 2023/06/27
Publication Type: Reports and Proceedings - Peer-Reviewed: Yes
Contents: Summary - Introduction - Main - Related

Synopsis: The real number of autistic people in England could be over double the number cited in national health policy documents. Autistic people may exhibit signs such as differences in their social communication and social interaction, alongside restricted and repetitive patterns of behaviors, interests and activities. Now researchers are calling for better access to diagnostic services for adults, and better support after diagnosis as many autistic people require adjustments to be made to ensure equal access healthcare, employment, and local authority support.

Introduction

"Autism in England: Assessing Under diagnosis in a Population-Based Cohort Study of Prospectively Collected Primary Care Data" - The Lancet Regional Health Europe.

The true number of autistic people in England may be more than double the number often cited in national health policy documents, suggests a new study by UCL researchers.

Main Digest

The first-of-its-kind research, published in The Lancet Regional Health Europe, estimated how many adults in England may have undiagnosed autism.

To do this, the researchers calculated the number of people who had received an autism diagnosis, from anonymised data from more than 5 million individuals registered at GP practices in England between 2000 and 2018.

They then compared these figures with a lower (c.1%) and upper (c.3%) estimate of how common autism really is in the population.

The lower estimate was based on the widely stated figure that around 1% of people in England are autistic. This came from epidemiological research published in 2011, before changes to the diagnostic criteria for autism that made them more inclusive.

Meanwhile, the upper estimate was based on rates of diagnosed autism in young people (aged 10-19) in the researchers' dataset. This is because young people are most likely to have had their autism recognised since providers are now very aware of autism in young people.

The team's estimates suggest that between 150,000 and 500,000 people aged 20 to 49 years-old may be autistic but undiagnosed.

Meanwhile, between 250,000 and 600,000 autistic people over the age of 50 may be undiagnosed - more than 9 in 10 of all autistic people.

The midpoint of these figures translates to approximately 750,000 undiagnosed autistic people aged 20 and above, in England. This brings the total autistic population to over 1.2million - approaching double the figure of 700,000 cited by the government for the entirety of the UK*.

Now researchers are calling for better access to diagnostic services for adults, and better support after diagnosis.

They also want to encourage greater acceptance and understanding of neurodiversity in society.

Lead researcher, post-doctoral researcher Elizabeth O'Nions (UCL Psychology & Language Sciences), said:

"Historically, autism has been considered as a condition of childhood. But recently, awareness has been growing that it is present across the lifespan - in adults as well as young people."

"Nevertheless, autism is still under-recognised in adults. Our estimates suggest that about 180,000 people aged 20-plus had an autism diagnosis as of 2018, meaning that most autistic adults in England were undiagnosed."

"This matters because autistic people often experience discrimination and exploitation in society. They may have unmet support needs, even when they appear to be coping with life."

"Having a diagnosis means that someone can advocate for their right to reasonable adjustments and the support they need. Recognising that someone with an intellectual disability is autistic can also help people to understand and support them better."

Autistic people may exhibit signs such as differences in their social communication and social interaction, alongside restricted and repetitive patterns of behaviours, interests and activities.

Many autistic people require adjustments to be made to ensure equal access healthcare, employment, and local authority support.

Dr O'Nions added:

"Our findings indicate that there is still a substantial diagnostic gap in adults compared to children and young people when it comes to autism in England."

"This may partly reflect a lack of awareness and understanding of autism in adults on the part of healthcare professionals. Older adults may also be less likely to self-identify as autistic, meaning that they do not come to the attention of services."

"Meanwhile, providers may be hesitant to raise the issue of autism given the uncertainty around waiting times for a diagnosis and the availability of support or specialist services post-diagnosis."

The research was funded by Dunhill Medical trust, Economic and Social Research Council, Medical Research Council, National Institute for Health and Care Research, Wellcome, and the Royal College of Psychiatrists.

Study Limitations

Primary care records are not directly linked to secondary care records, which could mean that some diagnoses are not represented in the study.

Meanwhile, the data does not cover all English GP practices, meaning that it wasn't possible to map local variation in diagnostic rates at a granular level.

Attribution/Source(s):

This peer reviewed publication was selected for publishing by the editors of Disabled World due to its significant relevance to the disability community. Originally authored by University College London, and published on 2023/06/26 (Edit Update: 2023/06/27), the content may have been edited for style, clarity, or brevity. For further details or clarifications, University College London can be contacted at ucl.ac.uk. NOTE: Disabled World does not provide any warranties or endorsements related to this article.

Related Publications

Share This Information To:
𝕏.com Facebook Reddit

Page Information, Citing and Disclaimer

Disabled World is an independent disability community founded in 2004 to provide news and information to people with disabilities, seniors, their family and carers. We'd love for you to follow and connect with us on social media!

Cite This Page (APA): University College London. (2023, June 26 - Last revised: 2023, June 27). Number of Autistic People in England May Be Double Previously Reported. Disabled World. Retrieved July 18, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/health/neurology/autism/autistic-england.php

Permalink: <a href="https://www.disabled-world.com/health/neurology/autism/autistic-england.php">Number of Autistic People in England May Be Double Previously Reported</a>: The real number of autistic people in England could be over double the number cited in national health policy documents.

Disabled World provides general information only. Materials presented are never meant to substitute for qualified medical care. Any 3rd party offering or advertising does not constitute an endorsement.