Skip to main content
Accessibility|Contact|Privacy|Terms|Cookies

Reduced Attention to Audiovisual Synchrony in Infancy May Predict Autism Diagnosis

  • Published: 2018-01-23 : *Press Release by Uppsala University : Contact: uu.se
  • Synopsis: Infants who pay little attention to synchronous sights and sounds may be at elevated risk for developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Quote: "The study is a part of the larger project Early Autism Sweden (EASE), which is a collaboration between Uppsala University and the Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders at Karolinska Institutet (KIND)."

Main Document

An ability to integrate information from different sensory modalities is important for infants' development and for their perception of the environment. A new study suggests that infants who pay little attention to synchronous sights and sounds may be at elevated risk for developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This knowledge about early development in ASD may contribute to earlier detection and intervention in the future.

The findings were recently published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

The researchers let the infants observe a computer screen on which half of the screen showed objects that moved in synchrony with a sound and the other half showed objects that moved without any relation to the sound. The participants who fulfilled criteria for ASD at three years of age looked equally long at both sides, while children with typical development showed a strong preference for audiovisual synchrony, defined as changes in object velocity happening at the same time as changes in sound volume.

Mother and child doing a test. The persons are not part of the study - Photo Credit: Terje Falck Ytter.
About This Image: Mother and child doing a test. The persons are not part of the study - Photo Credit: Terje Falck Ytter.
"We expected an effect in this direction, but were nevertheless surprised to see that the group differences were so large," says Terje Falck-Ytter, Associate Professor at the Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, and Principal Investigator for the study. "We believe the findings are important because they point to a rather basic function that has not been studied much earlier in this context."

The study is a part of the larger project Early Autism Sweden (EASE), which is a collaboration between Uppsala University and the Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders at Karolinska Institutet (KIND). The project includes younger siblings of children with ASD, ADHD or language disorder. The infants are followed longitudinally from five months of age until they reach six years. The participants in the current experiment were 10 months old when their visual preferences were examined and were followed until three years, when the diagnostic evaluation was conducted. In total, 33 infants with an older sibling with ASD took part in the study, of whom thirteen met criteria for ASD at follow-up. The study also included a control group consisting of fourteen infants at low (average) risk for ASD.

"Currently, ASD cannot be reliably diagnosed before 2-3 years of age, and despite a lot of research we still know too little about the causes. Even if twin studies suggest that genetic factors play an important role, we still do not know enough about which specific genes are involved and how they affect the developing brain to cause ASD. Our philosophy is that studying the early development of ASD will help clarify the picture," Falck-Ytter explains.

The results demonstrated significant group differences, but it is too early to say whether the method in its current form can facilitate early detection in a clinical context.

"We used eye tracking to measure the infants' gaze, and the experiment lasted only a few minutes. It is of course fascinating and promising that one can forecast with some degree of accuracy how a child will develop based on such a short measurement of gaze patterns. At the same time it is important to bear in mind that significant results at the group level do not imply that one can take this eye tracking 'test' and get accurate results on an individual level," says Falck-Ytter.


Have Your Say! - Add your comment or discuss this article on our FaceBook Page.


Interesting Similar Topics
1 : CARD Reacts to CDC Announcement of 15% Increase in Autism Rate : Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD).
2 : Autism Prevalence Increases to 1 in 59 US Children : U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
3 : Worldwide Free Online Course About Autism : Torrens University Australia.
4 : Autism's Social Deficits Reversed by Romidepsin Anti-Cancer Drug : University at Buffalo.
5 : Urine and Blood Tests Can Indicate Autism in Children : University of Warwick.
From our Autism Facts and Information section - Full List (206 Items)


Submit disability news, coming events, as well as assistive technology product news and reviews.


Loan Information for low income singles, families, seniors and disabled. Includes home, vehicle and personal loans.


Famous People with Disabilities - Well known people with disabilities and conditions who contributed to society.


List of awareness ribbon colors and their meaning. Also see our calendar of awareness dates.


Blood Pressure Chart - What should your blood pressure be, and information on blood group types/compatibility.





1 : Eating at Night, Sleeping By Day Alters Key Blood Proteins
2 : Interior Car Temperature Can Become Life-threatening for Children in an Hour
3 : 20 New Episodes of Letters to Lynette with Dr. Lynette Louise to Air on The Autism Channel in 2018
4 : Turnstone Center Designated as Official Paralympic Training Site by US Olympic Committee
5 : Help Your Child in School by Adding Language to The Math
6 : 50% of Retirees Saw Little or No COLA Increase in Net 2018 Social Security Benefits
7 : Turnstone Endeavor Games Concludes with National Records Broken
8 : Spinning in Circles and Learning From Myself by Tsara Shelton

*Press Release by Uppsala University: Disabled World makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith. If you are connected with this page and want it corrected/updated please contact us.



Disclaimer: This site does not employ and is not overseen by medical professionals. Content on Disabled World is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. See our Terms of Service for more information.

Reporting Errors: Disabled World is an independent website, your assistance in reporting outdated or inaccurate information is appreciated. If you find an error please let us know.

© 2004 - 2018 Disabled World™