Garden Pollen and Tree Allergies

Allergies and Allergens

Author: Greater Austin Allergy and Immunology
Published: 2010/02/14 - Updated: 2021/11/10
Contents: Summary - Introduction - Main - Related

Synopsis: Pollen from trees and grasses can cause allergy symptoms including sneezing itchy eyes congestion and asthma attacks. People with allergies can also trim irritation by carefully choosing the plants they include in their landscaping or garden. Certain flowers, trees and grasses are naturally better suited for the gardens of allergic people. Immunotherapies designed to elicit or amplify an immune response are classified as activation immunotherapies, while immunotherapies that reduce or suppress are classified as suppression immunotherapies.

Introduction

Avoid Allergens to Reap the Rewards of Gardening - The beauty of budding plants and bouquet of aromas are sources of satisfaction for many gardeners. For allergy sufferers, though, gardening can be as much a chore as pursuit of passion.

Main Digest

Pollen from trees, shrub and grasses can cause an onslaught of allergy symptoms, including sneezing, itchy eyes, congestion and in some cases, an asthma attack. But sensitive people can take a few simple steps to minimize their risk of exposure to bothersome allergens, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI).

"Gardening outside during times of high pollen counts puts patients at risk for severe allergic symptoms," said Dr. Henry Legere, (austinallergist.com). "Avoidance measures, as well as the use of medications and allergy immunotherapy, can make the difference between having fun in the garden and being miserable."

An allergist/immunologist can help determine what plant species are causing an allergic reaction and advise on the best times of day or season to work in the garden. For example, pollen levels are typically lower on rainy, cloudy and windless days. Immunotherapy (allergy shots), medications and other treatments can also help reduce symptoms.

Immunotherapy is defined as the treatment of disease by inducing, enhancing, or suppressing an immune response. Immunotherapies designed to elicit or amplify an immune response are classified as activation immunotherapies, while immunotherapies that reduce or suppress are classified as suppression immunotherapies.

People with allergies can also trim irritation by carefully choosing the plants they include in their landscaping or garden. Certain flowers, trees and grasses are naturally better suited for the gardens of allergic people. They are less likely to produce bothersome pollen and will still add color and variety to the garden. These include:

In general, highly-allergenic plants to avoid include:

The best way to determine which plants will trigger reactions is through skin testing at an allergist/immunologist's office. An allergist/immunologist can help patients develop strategies to avoid troublesome plants and pollen and can prescribe medication to alleviate symptoms.

Other Tips to Consider

Anti-inflammatory medications like nasal steroid sprays and Singulair must be used regularly to be effective and take time to build up in your system. Allergic inflammation is easier to prevent than to treat once it is established, so start taking your medications now in anticipation of the March allergens.

Whenever working around plants likely to cause an allergic reaction, avoid touching your eyes or face. You may also consider wearing a mask to reduce the amount of pollen spores that you breathe in.

Wear gloves and long sleeves and pants to minimize skin contact with allergens. Leave gardening tools and clothing - such as gloves and shoes - outside to avoid bringing allergens indoors. Shower immediately after gardening or doing other yard work.

Consult with an Allergist/Immunologist

Contact an allergist/immunologist to identify specific causes of allergic reactions or to get information on treatment options and tips to reduce allergen exposure. An allergist/immunologist is the best qualified medical professional to manage the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of allergies and asthma.

Dr. Henry Legere is a Harvard-trained board certified allergist serving the greater Austin area with practice locations in Westlake and Round Rock.

Attribution/Source(s):

This quality-reviewed publication was selected for publishing by the editors of Disabled World due to its significant relevance to the disability community. Originally authored by Greater Austin Allergy and Immunology, and published on 2010/02/14 (Edit Update: 2021/11/10), the content may have been edited for style, clarity, or brevity. For further details or clarifications, Greater Austin Allergy and Immunology can be contacted at austinallergist.com. NOTE: Disabled World does not provide any warranties or endorsements related to this article.

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Cite This Page (APA): Greater Austin Allergy and Immunology. (2010, February 14 - Last revised: 2021, November 10). Garden Pollen and Tree Allergies. Disabled World. Retrieved July 24, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/health/respiratory/allergies/pollen.php

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