Dealing With Tree Pollen Allergies

Author: Thomas C. Weiss
Published: 2013/06/11 - Updated: 2021/11/10
Contents: Summary - Main - Related Publications

Synopsis: For people who experience tree pollen allergies, the pollen in the air in springtime marks the start of a season filled with itchy and watery eyes, sneezing, and even more uncomfortable allergy symptoms. Allergic reaction to tree pollen may cause mental dullness and fatigue. You might feel like you have a cold or are coming down with the flu. Your skin may feel itchy or flushed or you may have a burning sensation. The distance you live from the trees that trigger your allergies makes a huge difference. A tree in your own yard may expose you to up to ten times as much pollen as one that is located down the street from you.

Main Digest

Tree pollen is one of the more common causes of allergy symptoms, particularly in spring. The majority of trees release their pollen in late winter or early spring. Tree pollens that trigger allergies in people are usually very powdery and fine. The wind has the ability to carry tree pollens for miles.

Despite the fact that tree pollen might be nearly invisible, inhaling even small amounts of it may trigger allergy symptoms in a person. The trees that often trigger allergies include Elm trees as this writer has discovered - there are many of them in Pueblo, Colorado. Other trees that can cause allergies include:

People who experience tree pollen allergies at times assume that trees with flowers that are colorful, such as cherry or apple trees, are more likely to trigger symptoms. The fact is that flowering trees usually have pollen that is larger and stickier that does not blow in the wind or cause symptoms. Some things can make tree pollen allergies worse; these things include the following.

The Symptoms of Tree Allergies

For people who experience tree pollen allergies, the pollen in the air in springtime marks the start of a season filled with itchy and watery eyes, sneezing, and even more uncomfortable allergy symptoms. Pollen is produced by trees as a part of their reproductive process. In some people, the presence of pollen triggers an overproduction of, 'histamine,' which then produces allergy symptoms.

Tree pollen allergies can make a person's eyes water and itch. Your eyes may appear inflamed and red and there might be some crusting along your eyelids. You might notice that you have dark circles under your eyes sometimes referred to as, 'allergic shiners,' which are caused by an increased flow of blood to your sinuses.

People with allergies to tree pollen may experience nasal congestion and running nose at the same time. They might sneeze frequently and have a nose that itches. A runny nose might also cause postnasal drip. Children many times develop a crease in their noses from rubbing their runny nose upward.

Allergies to tree pollen may also cause you to experience a scratchy and sore throat. The soreness may be caused by inflammation, postnasal drip or both. You might find that you cough a lot and that your throat feels itchy. You may also become hoarse or develop laryngitis.

Allergic reaction to tree pollen may cause mental dullness and fatigue. You might feel like you have a cold or are coming down with the flu. Your skin may feel itchy or flushed or you may have a burning sensation. Some people might experience dizziness, shivering, or hyperactivity. Others may experience stomach pains or cramps or joint pains. If you experience tree pollen allergies, foods in the related plant family may also cause allergy symptoms in a condition referred to as, 'oral allergy syndrome.'

Dealing With Tree Pollen Allergies

Some different actions on your part can help you to deal with tree pollen allergies. The allergies people experience to tree pollen may vary in intensity, so it is important to know which trees are affecting you. Among the things you can do to deal with tree pollen allergies are:

Unfortunately, trees may aggravate the allergies you experience whether or not they are located on your property. Trees release large amounts of pollen that can be distributed even miles away from the original source. Trees are the earliest producers of pollen, releasing pollen as early as January in Southern states in America and as late as May or June in states located in the north.

If you purchase trees for your yard, buy ones that do not aggravate allergies. Avoid going outside during tree pollen allergy season between the hours of 5:00AM and 10:00AM. Save outdoor activities for late in the afternoon or after a heavy rain when tree pollen levels are lower.

Keep the windows in your home and vehicle closed in order to lower your exposure to pollen. Use air conditioners to keep cool and avoid using attic and window fans. Understand that tree pollen can also be transported inside of your home on people and pets. Dry your clothing in a dryer instead of hanging them outside, otherwise tree pollen may collect on your clothes and get carried inside.

Avoid Allergens to Reap the Rewards of Gardening: The beauty of budding plants and bouquet of aromas are sources of satisfaction for many gardeners. For allergy sufferers, though, gardening can be as much a chore as pursuit of passion...

Author Credentials:

Thomas C. Weiss is a researcher and editor for Disabled World. Thomas attended college and university courses earning a Masters, Bachelors and two Associate degrees, as well as pursing Disability Studies. As a Nursing Assistant Thomas has assisted people from a variety of racial, religious, gender, class, and age groups by providing care for people with all forms of disabilities from Multiple Sclerosis to Parkinson's; para and quadriplegia to Spina Bifida. Explore Thomas' complete biography for comprehensive insights into his background, expertise, and accomplishments.

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Cite This Page (APA): Weiss, T. C. (2013, June 11). Dealing With Tree Pollen Allergies. Disabled World. Retrieved April 15, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/health/respiratory/allergies/tree-pollen.php

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