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OxyContin - Information Uses and Side Effects

Published: 2009-09-09
Author: Disabled World
Peer-Reviewed Publication: N/A
Jump to: Main Digest | Publications

Synopsis: OxyContin is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers and is similar to morphine. OxyContin is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. It is similar to morphine. OxyContin tablets are used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain relief associated with injuries, bursitis, dislocations, fractures, neuralgia, arthritis, lower back pain, and pain associated with cancer.

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Main Digest

OxyContin is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. It is similar to morphine. OxyContin tablets are used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain relief associated with injuries, bursitis, dislocations, fractures, neuralgia, arthritis, lower back pain, and pain associated with cancer.

This article is from our digest of publications relating to Pharmaceutical Information that also includes:

Generic Name: oxycodone (ox i KOE done)

Brand Names: ETH-Oxydose, OxyContin, Oxyfast, OxyIR, Percolone, Roxicodone, Roxicodone Intensol

OxyContin is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. It is similar to morphine. OxyContin tablets are used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain relief associated with injuries, bursitis, dislocations, fractures, neuralgia, arthritis, lower back pain, and pain associated with cancer.

OxyContin was the best-selling non-generic narcotic pain reliever in the U.S.; in 2002, over 7.2 million prescriptions were written for it, for total sales of $1.5 billion.

Oxycodone is an opioid analgesic medication synthesized from opium-derived thebaine. It was developed in 1916 in Germany, as one of several new semi-synthetic opioids with several benefits over the older traditional opiates and opioids: morphine, diacetylmorphine (heroin), and codeine.

Oxycodone can be combined with inert binders (e.g., OxyContin); with paracetamol, also known as acetaminophen (e.g., Percocet, Endocet, Tylox, and Roxicet); with aspirin (e.g., Percodan, Endodan, Roxiprin); and with ibuprofen (Combunox).

OxyContin is currently available in 5 mg (blue) tablets in Canada and the U.K.; 10 mg (white) in Canada, the U.S., and the U.K.; 15 mg (grey) in the U.S.; 20 mg (pink) in Canada, the U.S., and the U.K.; 30 mg (brown) in the U.S.; 40 mg (tan) in Canada, the U.S., and the U.K.; 60 mg (red) in the U.S.; and 80 mg (green) in Canada, the U.S., and the U.K.

Oxycodone can be administered orally, intranasally, via intravenous/intramuscular/subcutaneous injection or rectally. The bio-availability of oral administration averages 60-87%, with rectal administration yielding the same results; intranasal varies between 55-70%.

The most commonly reported effects include constipation, fatigue, dizziness, nausea, lightheadedness, headache, dry mouth, anxiety, pruritus, euphoria, and diaphoresis.

There is a high risk of experiencing severe withdrawal symptoms if a patient discontinues oxycodone abruptly. Therefore therapy should be gradually discontinued rather than abruptly discontinued. People who use oxycodone in a hazardous or harmful fashion are at even higher risk of severe withdrawal symptoms as they tend to use higher than prescribed doses. The symptoms of oxycodone withdrawal are the same as for other opiate based painkillers and may include "anxiety, nausea, insomnia, muscle pain, fevers, and other flu like symptoms.

OxyContin may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. OxyContin should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction.

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Disabled World provides general information only. The materials presented are never meant to substitute for professional medical care by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such. Financial support is derived from advertisements or referral programs, where indicated. Any 3rd party offering or advertising does not constitute an endorsement.


Cite This Page (APA): Disabled World. (2009, September 9). OxyContin - Information Uses and Side Effects. Disabled World. Retrieved October 2, 2022 from www.disabled-world.com/medical/pharmaceutical/oxycontin.php

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