Laundry Detergent Pods Deadly Risk for Children

Author: Nationwide Children's Hospital
Published: 2014/11/10 - Updated: 2021/10/19
Contents: Summary - Introduction - Main - Related

Synopsis: Laundry detergent pods are small, colorful, and may look like candy or juice to a young child. Children who put detergent pods in their mouths risk swallowing a large amount of concentrated chemicals. It can take just a few seconds for children to grab them, break them open, and swallow the toxic chemicals they contain, or get the chemicals in their eyes.

Introduction

One young child per day hospitalized in 2012 and 2013 because of pods; researchers recommend households with young children use traditional detergent instead.

Main Digest

Laundry detergent pods began appearing on U.S. store shelves in early 2010, and people have used them in growing numbers ever since. The small packets can be tossed into a washing machine without ever having to measure out a liquid or powder. The convenience, though, has come with risks for young children.

A new study from researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital found that from 2012 through 2013, U.S. poison control centers received reports of 17,230 children younger than 6 years of age swallowing, inhaling, or otherwise being exposed to chemicals in laundry detergent pods. That's nearly one young child every hour. A total of 769 young children were hospitalized during that period, an average of one per day. One child died.

One and two year-olds accounted for nearly two-thirds of cases. Children that age often put items in their mouths as a way of exploring their environments. Children who put detergent pods in their mouths risk swallowing a large amount of concentrated chemicals. The vast majority of exposures in this study were due to ingestion.

"Laundry detergent pods are small, colorful, and may look like candy or juice to a young child," said Marcel J. Casavant, MD, a co-author of the study, chief of toxicology at Nationwide Children's Hospital and medical director of the Central Ohio Poison Center. "It can take just a few seconds for children to grab them, break them open, and swallow the toxic chemicals they contain, or get the chemicals in their eyes."

Nearly half (48%) of children vomited after laundry detergent pod exposure. Other common effects were;

A leading manufacturer of laundry detergent pods began changing its packaging in the spring of 2013, introducing containers that were not see-through and adding latches and a warning label to the containers. However, laundry detergent pods from many makers continue to be sold in see-through packages with zip-tops or other easily opened containers.

"It is not clear that any laundry detergent pods currently available are truly child resistant; a national safety standard is needed to make sure that all pod makers adopt safer packaging and labeling," said Gary Smith, MD, DrPH, the study's senior author and director of the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital. "Parents of young children should use traditional detergent instead of detergent pods."

Parents and child caregivers can help children stay safe by following these tips:

Data for this study came from the National Poison Database System, the most comprehensive and accurate database available for investigation of poisonings in the United States. The study was conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center, both at Nationwide Children's Hospital, and The Ohio State University College of Medicine.

Attribution/Source(s):

This quality-reviewed publication titled Laundry Detergent Pods Deadly Risk for Children was selected for publishing by Disabled World's editors due to its relevance to the disability community. While the content may have been edited for style, clarity, or brevity, it was originally authored by Nationwide Children's Hospital and published 2014/11/10 (Edit Update: 2021/10/19). For further details or clarifications, you can contact Nationwide Children's Hospital directly at nationwidechildrens.org Disabled World does not provide any warranties or endorsements related to this article.

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Cite This Page (APA): Nationwide Children's Hospital. (2014, November 10 - Last revised: 2021, October 19). Laundry Detergent Pods Deadly Risk for Children. Disabled World. Retrieved June 21, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/medical/recalls/detergent.php

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