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Humanitarian Side of Plastic Surgery

  • Publish Date : 2014/12/06 - (Rev. 2018/04/01)
  • Author : Dr. J Plastic Surgery*
  • Contact : DrJPlasticSurgery.com

Synopsis: For respected surgeon Payam Jarrah-Nejad, MD, FICS, FACS, service to people in the community and the world at large is vitally important.


Main Document

When discussing the highly competitive world of Beverly Hills plastic surgery, terms like "humanitarian" are not necessarily the first thing that come to mind for most casual observers. However, for the widely respected surgeon Payam Jarrah-Nejad, MD, FICS, FACS, service to people in the community and the world at large is vitally important.

Known more familiarly to patients and colleagues as Dr. J, the doctor still regularly reflects on a trip he took to perform pro bono procedures in 2012 that would have a truly momentous impact for one small boy in Ayacucho, Peru.

"Dogs are running around everywhere you go," Dr. J said of the area in 2012. "Most of the time [the strays are] harmless, but you never know why a dog might attack."

As it happened, a male toddler was, in fact, gravely attacked during Dr. J's stay:

While local doctors were able to stabilize the boy, the child would likely have been badly disfigured for life without the attention of a highly skilled plastic surgeon. Fortunately, Dr. J was able to do the highly challenging work necessary to ensure a more normal appearance for the boy than would ordinarily have been medically possible in that portion of the Latin American nation.

"When people talk about plastic surgery, they typically think of facelifts, rhinoplasty, breast augmentation, and the like," Dr. J says today.

"They don't often think of the work needed to try and correct disfiguring injuries or a cleft lip or palette. In developed nations, we're fortunate that these procedures are usually handled in a fairly simple manner when children are in their very early infancy, but that's not always the case in less affluent areas. These relatively simple operations can make a huge difference in the life of a child as they grow into adulthood."

For Dr. J volunteer work is an extension of his regular day-to-day job in that he sees his work as a way to help people get the most out of their lives.

Whether patients are receiving rhinoplasty, which often improves the appearance of the nose while making breathing easier, or women correcting some of the less flattering after-effects of childbirth with mommy makeover surgery, Dr. J sees both his paying job and his volunteer work as being primarily a matter of service.

While plastic surgery is often criticized by less knowledgeable individuals as being all about surface appearances and vanity, it does a disservice both to doctors and patients in the opinion of Dr. J.

Whether a surgery is intended to fix a third-world child's cleft palette or removing skin folds from a Beverly Hills resident who has lost significant amounts of weight following a pregnancy or a successful weight loss operation, Dr. J sees his work as being about helping people have the comfort and confidence they need to have the best possible lives.

To learn more about Dr. J's work or to find out about a free initial consultation visit the doctor's web site at www.DrJPlasticSurgery.com or call his office at 310-993-3800.

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