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ICD-10: International Classification of Diseases Information

  • Synopsis: Published: 2014-02-14 (Revised/Updated 2017-06-28) - Information regarding ICD-10-CM, the International Classification of Diseases, which uses alphanumeric codes to identify known diseases and health issues - Thomas C. Weiss (Disabled World).
ICD-10

The 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD), a medical classification list by the World Health Organization (WHO). It codes for diseases, signs and symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances, and external causes of injury or diseases.

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Quote: "The ICD-10 is different from the ICD-9 in some different ways, although the overall content is fairly similar."

The move to ICD-10 is one of the largest challenges for the health care industry to appear during many of our lives. The, 'International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) is a revision of the ICD-9-CM system. Doctors and other health care providers use the system to classify and code all symptoms, diagnosis and procedures recorded in association with hospital care in America.

ICD-10-CM, like ICD-9-CM, is based on the International Classification of Diseases which is published by the World Health Organization (WHO). The International Classification of Diseases uses alphanumeric codes to identify known diseases and health issues. According to the WHO, the ICD helps with storage and retrieval of diagnostic information and the compilation of national mortality and morbidity statistics. The ICD-10-CM revision has more than 68,000 diagnostic codes compared to the 13,000 to be found in ICD-9-CM. The revision includes two times the categories and introduces alphanumeric category classifications for the first time.

The United States of America was going to start using ICD-10 on October 1st of 2013. Early in 2012, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced its intention to delay compliance to an unspecified date. On August 24th, Kathleen Sebelius announced a rule finalizing a one-year delay in the compliance date for ICD-10 codes. The new deadline is October 1st or 2014.

The ICD is designed to promote international comparability in the collection, processing, classification and presentation of mortality statistics. The process include providing a format for the reporting of causes of death on a death certificate. The reported conditions are translated into medical codes through use of the classification structure and the selection and modification rules contained in the applicable revision of the ICD. The coding rules improve the usefulness of mortality statistics published by the WHO.

The coding rules improve the usefulness of mortality statistics by presenting preference to certain categories, consolidating conditions, as well as by systematically selecting a single cause of death from a reported sequence of conditions. The single selected cause for tabulation is then called the underlying cause of death and the other reported causes are the non-underlying causes. The combination of the causes is the multiple causes of death.

The ICD has been periodically revised to incorporate changes in the health care field. The ICD-10 is different from the ICD-9 in some different ways, although the overall content is fairly similar. The differences include:

  • Some titles have changed
  • Conditions have been regrouped
  • Some chapters have been rearranged
  • ICD-10 has nearly twice as many categories
  • ICD-10 is printed in a 3-volume set; ICD-9 is a 2-volume set
  • ICD-10 has alphanumeric categories instead of numeric ones
  • Minor changes have been made in the coding rules for mortality

Chart showing health care professional confidence levels in their ability to meet the deadline
About This Image: Chart showing health care professional confidence levels in their ability to meet the deadline
For medical coders and billers, panicking might cross the mind all too easily. Where health care professionals as a whole are concerned, panic is not in the picture for the most part. Around 87% of health care professionals asked about readiness in relation to the ICD-10 say they are not panicking. They are confident they will be ready by October 1st. How confident are they

  • 4 percent are sure
  • 23 percent are confident
  • 9 percent are not confident
  • 22 percent are very confident
  • 42 percent are somewhat confident

The survey, which ended in the Fall of 2013, found that health care providers were not too far along with preparations and were unsure of where to begin. Yet they are not worried because they have until October of 2014. The fact is, health care providers are far from worry-free. They are concerned about cash flow after October 1st of this year, probably because they are going to do everything as they should - but you just don't know about health plans and the federal bureaucracy.

The WHO's, 'Collaborating Center for the Family of International Classifications for North America'

The WHO Collaborating Center for the Classification of Diseases for North America was established in the year 1976 to represent America and Canada in international activities related to study and revision of the International Classification of Diseases and Health Problems (ICD). By the year 1993, the Collaborating Center also assumed responsibility for work in North America on the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities, and Handicaps - now the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). In the year 2003, the Collaborating Center received new terms of reference as a WHO Collaborating Center for the Family of International Classifications. The North American Collaborating Center (NACC) is located at the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHSS), and works with the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) in cooperation with the Pan American Health Organization.

The NACC maintains liaison with WHO on Canadian and U.S. Government use, implementation and maintenance of the Family of International Classifications. The NACC coordinates activities in 3 major aspects of classification:

  • Disability
  • Mortality
  • Morbidity

The NACC works with the other WHO collaborating centers and related offices to coordinate and promote ICD and ICF applications. In the United States of America, NCHS has responsibility for ICD use in mortality statistics in collaboration with the States.

Development and use of the clinical modification of ICD and related classifications for morbidity applications are a shared responsibility with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). NCHS has the lead for diagnosis and CMS has the lead for procedures. NCHS also has responsibility for national disability statistics in America. In Canada, Statistics Canada has responsibility for ICD use in mortality statistics in collaboration with the Provinces and Territories. CIHI has responsibility for development and use of the clinical modification of ICD and procedure classification for morbidity applications. National disability statistics are the responsibility of Statistics Canada and CIHI.



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