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Enactive Torch Helps People with Vision Disabilities See Objects

  • Published: 2014-08-11 (Revised/Updated 2016-03-21) : University of Cincinnati (Tom Robinette - tom.robinette@uc.edu - Ph. 513-556-1825).
  • Synopsis: Surprising research could lead to new ways to help the visually impaired better navigate everyday life.
Enactive Torch

The enactive torch is a tactile feedback device used for experiments in sensory substitution. The ET a hand held device with distance sensors at one end and a vibrating motor that can be strapped to your wrist. The intensity of the vibration is lined to the distance of objects in front of the torch. It uses an Arduino pro-mini so it is totally user programmable and it includes a Sparkfun BlueSMiRF Gold bluetooth transmitter and a triple axis accelerometer so that data on usage can be logged remotely. Power comes from six AAA batteries and there is a charging socket so it can be recharged without removing the batteries.

Main Document

Quote: "The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) predicts that more than 6 million Americans age 40 and older will be affected by blindness or low vision by 2030 - double the number from 2004"

Visual impairment comes in many forms, and it's on the rise in America.

A University of Cincinnati experiment aimed at this diverse and growing population could spark development of advanced tools to help all the aging baby boomers, injured veterans, diabetics and white-cane-wielding pedestrians navigate the blurred edges of everyday life. Luis Favela explains his experiment

These tools could be based on a device called the Enactive Torch, which looks like a combination between a TV remote and Captain Kirk's weapon of choice. But it can do much greater things than change channels or stun aliens.

Luis Favela, a graduate student in philosophy and psychology, has found the torch enables the visually impaired to judge their ability to comfortably pass through narrow passages, like an open door or busy sidewalk, as good as if they were actually seeing such pathways themselves.

UC's Luis Favela explains a task to Mary Jean Amon during a demonstration of Favela's research experiment in the Perceptual-Motor Dynamics Lab.
About This Image: UC's Luis Favela explains a task to Mary Jean Amon during a demonstration of Favela's research experiment in the Perceptual-Motor Dynamics Lab.
The handheld torch uses infra-red sensors to "see" objects in front of it. When the torch detects an object, it emits a vibration - similar to a cellphone alert - through an attached wristband. The gentle buzz increases in intensity as the torch nears the object, letting the user make judgments about where to move based on a virtual touch.

"Results of this experiment point in the direction of different kinds of tools or sensory augmentation devices that could help people who have visual impairment or other sorts of perceptual deficiencies. This could start a research program that could help people like that," Favela says.

Favela presented his research "Augmenting the Sensory Judgment Abilities of the Visually Impaired" at the American Psychological Association's (APA) annual convention, held Aug. 7-10 in Washington, D.C. More than 11,000 psychology professionals, scholars and students from around the world annually attend APA's convention.

A Growing Population In Need:

Favela observes Amon as she uses the Enactive Torch during a demonstration of Favela's experiment.
About This Image: Favela observes Amon as she uses the Enactive Torch during a demonstration of Favela's experiment.
Favela studies how people perceive their environment and how those perceptions inform their judgments. For this experiment, he was inspired by what he knew about the surging population of visually impaired Americans. Student uses Enactive Torch

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) predicts that more than 6 million Americans age 40 and older will be affected by blindness or low vision by 2030 - double the number from 2004 - due to diabetes or other chronic diseases and the rapidly aging population.

The CDC also notes that vision loss is among the top 10 causes of disability in the U.S., and vision impairment is one of the most prevalent disabilities in children.

"In my research I've found that there's an emotional stigma that people who are visually impaired experience, particularly children," Favela says. "When you're a kid in elementary school, you want to blend in and be part of the group. It's hard to do that when you're carrying this big, white cane."

Substituting Sight With Touch:

The Enactive Torch uses infra-red sensors to "see" objects in front of it.
About This Image: The Enactive Torch uses infra-red sensors to "see" objects in front of it.
In Favela's experiment, 27 undergraduate students with normal or corrected-to-normal vision and no prior experience with mobility assistance devices were asked to make perceptual judgments about their ability to pass through an opening a few feet in front of them without needing to shift their normal posture. Favela tested participants' judgments in three ways: using only their vision, using a cane while blindfolded and using the Enactive Torch while blindfolded. The idea was to compare judgments made with vision against those made by touch. Detail shot of Enactive Torch

The results of the experiment were surprising. Favela figured vision-based judgments would be the most accurate because vision tends to be most people's dominant perceptual modality. However, he found the three types of judgments were equally accurate.

"When you compare the participants' judgments with vision, cane and Enactive Torch, there was not a significant difference, meaning that they made the same judgments," Favela says. "The three modalities are functionally equivalent. People can carry out actions just about to the same degree whether they're using their vision or their sense of touch. I was really surprised."

Favela plans additional experiments requiring more complicated judgments, such as the ability to step over an obstacle or to climb stairs. With further study and improvements to the Enactive Torch, Favela says similar tools that augment touch-based perception could have a significant impact on the lives of the visually impaired.

"If the future version of the Enactive Torch is smaller and more compact, kids who use it wouldn't stand out from the crowd, they might feel like they blend in more," he says, noting people can quickly adapt to using the torch. "That bodes well, say, for someone in the Marines who was injured by a roadside bomb. They could be devastated. But hope's not lost. They will learn how to navigate the world pretty quickly."

Additional contributors to Favela's research were UC psychology professors Michael Riley and Kevin Shockley, and Anthony Chemero, professor of philosophy and psychology.

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