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Portraits of Child Meningitis Survivors

Published: 2014-02-10 - Updated: 2021-09-03
Author: Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics | Contact: novartis.com

Synopsis: Photographer and artist Anne Geddes shows us thought provoking portraits of children who have lost limbs to meningitis. As a mother and passionate advocate of children, I want to empower parents to understand meningitis and know how best to protect their children. You only need to look at Amber, Ellie and Harvey to understand the impact of this devastating disease. Through the use of thought-provoking and inspiring photographs captured by campaign ambassador Anne Geddes, the project will highlight the impact that this sudden, aggressive disease can have on survivors and families.

Main Digest

Amber Travers (5), Ellie-May Challis (9), and Harvey Parry (8) will appear, alongside their families and other children affected by the disease from around the world, in a new e-book for the Protecting Our Tomorrows campaign, to be launched on World Meningitis Day, 24 April 2014.

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Amber, five, from Croxteth, Liverpool, is the youngest child to be photographed by Anne Geddes. Amber lost her legs and arms after contracting the disease aged two. She is pictured with her sister Jade.
Amber, five, from Croxteth, Liverpool, is the youngest child to be photographed by Anne Geddes. Amber lost her legs and arms after contracting the disease aged two. She is pictured with her sister Jade.

The project makes use of Anne's famous photographic skills to capture the beauty and innocence of childhood with the dreadful impact of meningitis in a way which is both compelling and unsentimental.

Anne said:

"As a mother and passionate advocate of children, I want to empower parents to understand meningitis and know how best to protect their children. You only need to look at Amber, Ellie and Harvey to understand the impact of this devastating disease. It really would be your worst nightmare to see any child go through such an ordeal."

"But at the same time, these children and their families are overcoming huge obstacles to rebuild their lives and these beautiful pictures capture their strength in the face of adversity."

Amber, who lost her arms and legs after contracting the disease aged two, was the youngest child to be photographed and appears alongside her sister Jade, aged eight. Ellie-May Challis lost her lower legs and arms at 16 months and is photographed with her twin sister Sophie. Harvey lost both his legs and part of his hands just one week after starting to walk, and is now a successful athlete running on blades.

Ellie-May, nine, from Little Clacton, Essex, lost her lower legs and arms after contracting meningitis at 16 months. She is photographed with her twin sister Sophie.
Ellie-May, nine, from Little Clacton, Essex, lost her lower legs and arms after contracting meningitis at 16 months. She is photographed with her twin sister Sophie.

Protecting Our Tomorrows is a global campaign, led by the Confederation of Meningitis Organizations (CoMO) and supported in the UK by Meningitis Now, Meningitis Research Foundation and Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics Limited. Through the use of thought-provoking and inspiring photographs captured by campaign ambassador Anne Geddes, the project will highlight the impact that this sudden, aggressive disease can have on survivors and families.

Bacterial meningitis is the leading infectious killer in children under five[1] and strikes 3,400 people every year in the UK[2]. The majority of these cases are caused by Meningitis B, which accounts for around 55% of all bacterial meningitis and septicaemia cases. Up to one in ten of those who contract meningitis will die[3] and many survivors are left with life-long after-effects, including amputations[4]. Vaccination is the most effective way to prevent and control bacterial meningitis,[5] however children in the UK are not routinely protected against all types.

Harvey, eight, from Enfield, Greater London, lost both of his legs to meningitis just one week after starting to walk. Harvey is now a successful child athlete.
Harvey, eight, from Enfield, Greater London, lost both of his legs to meningitis just one week after starting to walk. Harvey is now a successful child athlete.

Commenting jointly on the campaign, Meningitis Now and Meningitis Research Foundation said:

"Anne Geddes has delivered a unique and creative approach to a disease we have spent years fighting. Too many children face death and disability from meningitis every year. We hope these stunning portraits will raise awareness of the disease, its symptoms and the impact it has on thousands of families every year."

In addition to Amber, Ellie-May and Harvey, children from Australia, Canada, Germany, Ireland and Spain will also feature in the e-book.

References

1. Office for National Statistics. Mortality statistics: Deaths registered in 2012 (Series DR). Available at: www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/re-reference-tables.htmledition=tcm%3A77-277727. Accessed January 2014

2. Meningitis Research Foundation. UK Facts and Figures (webpage). Available at: www.meningitis.org/facts. Accessed January 2014

3. World Health Organization. Meningococcal meningitis fact-sheet. Nov 2012. Available at: www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs141/en/. Accessed January 2014

4. Rosenstein NE, et al. Meningococcal disease. N Engl J Med 2001;344:1378-88

5. World Health Organization. Meningococcal Position Paper. Weekly Epidemiological Record No. 40, 2002, 77, 329-340. Available at: www.who.int/immunization/wer7740meningococcal_Oct02_position_paper.pdf. Accessed January 2014.

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Cite This Page (APA): Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics. (2014, February 10). Portraits of Child Meningitis Survivors. Disabled World. Retrieved September 18, 2021 from www.disabled-world.com/communication/art/portraits.php