Firearms Injure or Kill Up to 25% of Juvenile Justice Youth After Detention

Who Goes to Detention? Most Are Just Kids From Poor Families

Author: Northwestern University
Published: 2023/04/22 - Updated: 2023/06/24
Peer-Reviewed: Yes
Contents: Summary - Main - Related Publications

Synopsis: This study is the first to focus on the incidence rate of firearm injuries and death within the juvenile justice population. Youth who have been previously involved with the juvenile justice system had up to 23 times the rate of firearm mortality than the general population Firearm mortality rates for most demographic groups in the study were significantly higher than the general population.

Main Digest

"Nonfatal Firearm Injury and Firearm Mortality in High-Risk Youths and Young Adults 25 Years After Detention" - JAMA Network Open.

A new study by Northwestern University found that among youth who had entered juvenile detention, one-quarter of Black and Hispanic males were later injured or killed by firearms within 16 years.

While the nation's youth and young adults are disproportionately affected by the daily occurrence of 100 firearm deaths and 234 non-fatal firearm injuries, youth who have been previously involved with the juvenile justice system had up to 23 times the rate of firearm mortality than the general population.

The study is the first to focus on the incidence rate of firearm injuries and death within the juvenile justice population.

"Who goes to detention? Most are just kids from poor families. Many of our participants had not even been convicted," said Linda Teplin, a behavioral scientist and the study's director. "Youth in the juvenile justice system are commonly viewed as perpetrators of violence - but we found that they are highly likely to become victims of firearm injury and death."

Teplin is the Owen L. Coon Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the senior author of the study.

"We need empirical studies to inform policy and guide decisions around the most promising and innovative interventions," said first author Nanzi Zheng, a Northwestern doctoral student in psychology. "To address our nation's epidemic of firearm injury and death, we also need to focus on the highest-risk youth, like those in the juvenile justice system."

"Nonfatal Firearm Injury and Firearm Mortality in High-Risk Youths and Young Adults 25 Years After Detention" was published by the journal JAMA Network Open on April 21, 2023.

Injury and Mortality Rates

Using data from the Northwestern Juvenile Project, a longitudinal investigation of 1,829 randomly selected youth who were newly admitted to juvenile detention in Cook County (Chicago), the researchers found one-quarter of Black and Hispanic males in the study were later injured or killed by firearms within 16 years of detention. They also found that the rate of firearm injury and death among juvenile justice males was nearly 14 times the rate among juvenile justice females.

Firearm mortality rates for most demographic groups in the study were significantly higher than the general population.

Firearm deaths among females in the study were 6.5 times higher than the general population.

Among males, non-Hispanic white males were 23 times more likely to be killed by firearms than those in the general population. The firearm mortality rate among Hispanic males was nearly 10 times higher than the general population.

Firearm death among Black males was 2.5 times higher than the general population. While significantly high, the number represents a less dramatic difference than other demographic groups because firearm mortality is already so high among Black males in the general population.

Study Implications

Teplin advises a creative and multidisciplinary approach to reducing firearm violence that involves legal and healthcare professionals, street outreach workers and public health researchers.

"People who have been shot are more likely to be injured again or killed. Therefore, hospital emergency departments are ideal settings to implement violence prevention interventions. Poverty also begets violence. We need to address the compound issues that lead to urban blight, such as inadequate housing, unemployment and poor infrastructure," Teplin said.

"The public cares a great deal about mass shootings, but they comprise less than 4% of all firearm deaths. We need to worry more about the everyday violence that disproportionately affects poor, urban youth, especially people of color."

Department of Justice Viewpoints

"These findings are sobering and underscore the need for further research to better understand the relationship between juvenile detention and firearm victimization," said Nancy La Vigne, director of the National Institute of Justice. "Given this study's racially disparate impacts, it is essential that we examine both the individual factors precipitating violent victimization and the larger context of structural inequality."

"As this study makes clear, vulnerability to gun violence is one of many adverse outcomes associated with juvenile detention," said Liz Ryan, administrator of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. "These findings demonstrate the comprehensive support that formerly detained youth need and highlights the need for additional research. We must continue to work together to better understand - and mitigate - the challenges faced after juvenile justice system involvement."

Research Support

Major funding for the Northwestern Juvenile Project was provided by the U.S. Department of Justice: National Institute of Justice and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; the National Institutes of Health; and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Conflict of Interest (COI) Statement

Dr Teplin reported receiving grants from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the National Institute of Justice, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute on Child Health and Human Development, the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the National Institutes of Health Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health Office of Research on Women's Health, the National Institutes of Health Office of Rare Disease Research, the US Department of Labor, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, the William T. Grant Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Owen L. Coon Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Chicago Community Trust during the conduct of the study. No other disclosures were reported.

Resources That Provide Relevant Related Information

Attribution/Source(s):

This peer reviewed publication pertaining to our Accidents and Disability section was selected for circulation by the editors of Disabled World due to its likely interest to our disability community readers. Though the content may have been edited for style, clarity, or length, the article "Firearms Injure or Kill Up to 25% of Juvenile Justice Youth After Detention" was originally written by Northwestern University, and submitted for publishing on 2023/04/22 (Edit Update: 2023/06/24). Should you require further information or clarification, Northwestern University can be contacted at the northwestern.edu website. Disabled World makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith.

📢 Discover Related Topics


👍 Share This Information To:
𝕏.com Facebook Reddit

Page Information, Citing and Disclaimer

Disabled World is an independent disability community founded in 2004 to provide disability news and information to people with disabilities, seniors, their family and/or carers. See our homepage for informative reviews, exclusive stories and how-tos. You can connect with us on social media such as X.com and our Facebook page.

Permalink: <a href="https://www.disabled-world.com/disability/accidents/firearms.php">Firearms Injure or Kill Up to 25% of Juvenile Justice Youth After Detention</a>

Cite This Page (APA): Northwestern University. (2023, April 22). Firearms Injure or Kill Up to 25% of Juvenile Justice Youth After Detention. Disabled World. Retrieved February 24, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/disability/accidents/firearms.php

Disabled World provides general information only. Materials presented are never meant to substitute for qualified professional medical care. Any 3rd party offering or advertising does not constitute an endorsement.