Nurse Practitioner-led Spinal Clinic Produced Impressive Results

Back Pain Information

Author: Wiley-Blackwell
Published: 2010/11/18
Contents: Summary - Introduction - Main - Related

Synopsis: Ninety-six percent of patients with back problems were satisfied with the assessment carried out by a specially trained nurse practitioner.

Introduction

Nurse practitioner-led spinal clinic produced impressive results and shorter waiting times - Study reports 100 percent agreement on clinical diagnosis and 96 percent patient satisfaction.

Main Digest

Ninety-six percent of patients with back problems were satisfied with the assessment carried out by a specially trained nurse practitioner, according to a study in the December issue of the Journal of Advanced Nursing.

Seventy-four percent were happy to see her rather than wait up to a year to see a surgeon, with less than a quarter of those who preferred to see a surgeon saying that the extra wait was acceptable.

The pilot study at Toronto Western Hospital in Ontario, Canada, was judged a resounding success after nurse practitioner Angela Sarro came up with exactly the same clinical diagnosis as orthopaedic spine surgeons Dr Yoga Raja Rampersaud and Dr Stephen Lewis in 100 percent of the 177 patients she assessed. She also suggested the same management plan as the two surgeons in 95 percent of cases.

"Waiting times for specialty consultations in public healthcare systems worldwide are lengthy and impose undue stress on patients waiting for further information and management of their condition" says Angela Sarro. "Back pain can be very unpleasant and debilitating and 85 percent of us will experience it at some point in our lives.

"According to the College of Family Physicians of Canada, 57 percent of people in Canada waited longer than four weeks for specialty care in 2006, compared with 60 percent in the USA, 46 percent in Australia, 40 percent in the UK, 23 percent in Germany and 22 percent in New Zealand.

"The aim of our study was to see whether a clinic led by a nurse practitioner could speed up the diagnosis and management of patients with certain spinal conditions pre-selected by the surgeons' offices."

The 96 male and 81 female patients ranged from 23 to 85 years of age, with an average age of 52. All had been referred by their family doctor with suspected disc herniation, spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease.

Key findings included:

"Nurse practitioners are nurses who have received additional specialist training" explains Angela Sarro. "They typically work in healthcare centers and primary care practices in the community, but their role is advancing into areas such as emergency departments and long-term care settings.

"At the moment there are clinical, legal and funding barriers in the Canadian health system that prevent nurse practitioners from being fully independent when it comes to assessing and managing patients who require specialist care.

"However, we feel that there may be scope for government-funded triage clinics led by nurse practitioners to reduce waiting times for spine consultations.

"This initiative would expand the role of the nurse practitioners and provide faster consultation and improved health outcomes for patients, families and communities."

Co-author Dr Yoga Raja Rampersaud adds: "We believe that our study demonstrates that nurse practitioners can play an effective and efficient role in delivering timely healthcare to patients requiring specific disease management in a specialty setting.

"Although skill levels will vary from one nurse practitioner to another, physicians can work with them to help them to develop expertise in their specialty area. Ongoing evaluation is also important to ensure that quality of care is maintained and that patients are satisfied with the consultation."

Nurse practitioner-led surgical spine consultation clinic. Sarro et al. Journal of Advanced Nursing. 66.12, pp2671-2676. (December 2010). DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05446.x

The Journal of Advanced Nursing (JAN) is an international, peer-reviewed, scientific journal. JAN contributes to the advancement of evidence-based nursing, midwifery and healthcare by disseminating high quality research and scholarship of contemporary relevance and with potential to advance knowledge for practice, education, management or policy. www.journalofadvancednursing.com

Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, with strengths in every major academic and professional field and partnerships with many of the world's leading societies. Wiley-Blackwell publishes nearly 1,500 peer-reviewed journals and 1,500+ new books annually in print and online, as well as databases, major reference works and laboratory protocols. For more information, please visit www.wileyblackwell.com or our new online platform, Wiley Online Library (www.wileyonlinelibrary.com), one of the world's most extensive multidisciplinary collections of online resources, covering life, health, social and physical sciences, and humanities.

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Cite This Page (APA): Wiley-Blackwell. (2010, November 18). Nurse Practitioner-led Spinal Clinic Produced Impressive Results. Disabled World. Retrieved July 13, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/disability/types/spinal/backpain/spinal-clinic.php

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