Food Storage Duration Guide: Refrigerated, Frozen, and Pantry Produce

Disability Cooking Tips and Recipes

Ian C. Langtree - Content Writer/Editor for Disabled World
Published: 2024/06/30
Publication Type: Informative
Contents: Summary - Definition - Introduction - Main - Related

Synopsis: Comprehensive guide detailing recommended storage durations for food items, including frozen goods, refrigerated products, packaged foods, and common household staples. The term "shelf life after coded date" generally refers to the period during which a food product remains at its best quality after the date indicated by a specific code on its packaging. This coded date can be a "best before" date, "expiration" date, "use by" date, or other types of date codes used by manufacturers to indicate the freshness and quality of the product. Food manufacturers use various date codes to ensure consumers receive their products at peak quality. While some foods deteriorate quickly, others maintain their quality longer than expected.

Introduction

Is food still safe to eat after the date on the package has expired? In many cases, it is! Food manufacturers use various date codes to ensure consumers receive their products at peak quality. While some foods deteriorate quickly, others maintain their quality longer than expected.

What about the foods in the pantry? Most shelf-stable foods are safe indefinitely. For instance, canned goods can last for years as long as the can is in good condition (no rust, dents, or swelling). Packaged foods like cereal, pasta, and cookies are generally safe past the 'best by' date, although they may eventually become stale or develop an off flavor. You'll be able to tell if the food has lost quality when you open the package. Many dates on foods refer to quality rather than safety, and the storage times listed in the charts below are intended as useful guidelines, not strict rules.

Main Digest

Is food still safe to eat after the date on the package has expired? In many cases, it is! Food manufacturers use various date codes to ensure consumers receive their products at peak quality. While some foods deteriorate quickly, others maintain their quality longer than expected.

What about the foods in the pantry? Most shelf-stable foods are safe indefinitely. For instance, canned goods can last for years as long as the can is in good condition (no rust, dents, or swelling). Packaged foods like cereal, pasta, and cookies are generally safe past the 'best by' date, although they may eventually become stale or develop an off flavor. You'll be able to tell if the food has lost quality when you open the package. Many dates on foods refer to quality rather than safety, and the storage times listed in the charts below are intended as useful guidelines, not strict rules.

Food Types: Shelf Life, Refrigerated and Frozen

Jump to:

Refrigerated Foods: Shelf Life After Coded Date
ProductRefrigeratedFrozen
Beverages, Fruit
Juice in cartons, fruit drinks, punch 3 weeks, unopened. 7-10 days open 8-12 months
Dairy Products
Butter 1-3 months 6-9 months
Buttermilk 1-2 weeks 3 months
Cheese, hard (such as cheddar, Swiss, block Parmesan) 6 months unopened - 3-4 weeks opened 6 months
Parmesan, shredded 1 month opened 3-4 months
Shredded cheddar, mozzarella, etc. 1 month 3-4 months
Cheese, processed slices 1-2 months Does not freeze well
Cheese, soft (such as Brie, Bel Paese) 1 week 6 months
Cottage cheese, ricotta 1 week Does not freeze well
Cream cheese 2 weeks Does not freeze well
Cream, whipping, ultra-pasteurized 1 month Do not freeze
Whipped, sweetened 1 day 1-2 months
Aerosol can, real whipped cream 3-4 weeks Do not freeze
Aerosol can, nondairy topping 3 months Do not freeze
Cream, half and half 3-4 days 4 months
Dips, sour cream based 2 weeks Do not freeze
Egg substitutes, liquid unopened 10 days Do not freeze
Egg substitutes, Opened 3 days Do not freeze
Eggnog, commercial 3-5 days 6 months
Eggs in shell 3-5 weeks Do not freeze
Raw egg whites, yolks 2-4 days 12 months
Hard boiled eggs 1 week Does not freeze well
Kefir (fermented milk) 1 week after date
Opened 1-2 days
Do not freeze
Margarine 6 months 12 months
Milk, plain or flavored 1 week 3 months
Pudding Package date or 2 days after opening Do not freeze
Sour cream 7-21 days Does not freeze well
Yogurt 7-14 days 1-2 months
Dough
Tube cans of biscuits, rolls, pizza dough, etc. Use-by date Do not freeze
Ready-to-bake pie crust Use-by date 2 months
Cookie dough Use by date - Unopened or opened 2 months
PASTA, fresh 1-2 days or use-by date on package 2 months
PESTO or SALSA Date on carton or 3 days after opening 1-2 months
Soy Products
Soy or rice beverage, refrigerated 7-10 days Do not freeze
Tofu 1 week or package date 5 months
Miso 3 months Do not freeze
Refrigerated Foods: Shelf Life After Coded Date
Meat, Poultry and FishRefrigeratedFrozen
Fish
Lean fish (cod, flounder, haddock, halibut, sole, etc.) 1-2 days 6-8 months
Lean fish (Pollock, ocean perch, rock-fish, sea trout) 1-2 days 4 months
Fatty fish (bluefish, mackerel, mullet, salmon, tuna, etc.) 1-2 days 2-3 months
Caviar, fresh, in jar 1-4 weeks or 2 days open Doesn't freeze well
Cooked fish, all 3-4 days 1-2 months
Surimi seafood 3-4 days or package date 9 months
Smoked fish
Herring 3-4 days 2 months
Salmon, whitefish, cold-smoked 5-8 days 2 months
Salmon, whitefish, hot smoked 14 days or date on vacuum pkg 6 months in vacuum pkg
Shellfish
Shrimp, scallops, crayfish, squid 1-2 days 3-6 months
Shucked clams, mussels and oysters 1-2 days 3-4 months
Crab meat, fresh 1-2 days 4 months
Crab meat, pasteurized 6 months unopened - 3-5 days, opened 4 months
Crab legs, king, dungeness, snow 5 days 9-12 months
Live clams, mussels, crab and oysters 1-2 days 2-3 months
Live lobsters 1-2 days 2-3 months
Lobster tails 1-2 days 6 months
Cooked shellfish, all 3-4 days 3 months
Meat, Fresh
Beef, lamb, pork or veal chops, steaks, roasts 3-5 days 4-12 months
Ground meat 1-2 days 3-4 months
Variety meats (liver, tongue, chitterlings, etc.) 1-2 days 3-4 months
Cooked meats (after home cooking) 3-4 days 2-3 months
Meat, Smoked or Processed
Bacon 1 week 1 month
Corned beef,in pouch with pickling juices 5-7 days 1 month
Ham, canned (keep refrigerated label) 6-9 months Do not freeze
Ham, fully cooked, whole 1 week 1-2 months
Ham, fully cooked, slices or half 3-4 days 1-2 months
Ham, cook before eating 1 week 1-2 months
Hot dogs, sealed in package 2 weeks 1-2 months
Hot dogs, after opening 1 week 1-2 months
Lunch meats, sealed in package 2 weeks 1-2 months
Lunch meats, after opening 3-5 days 1-2 months
Sausage, raw, bulk type 1-2 days 1-2 months
Sausage, smoked links, patties 1 week 1-2 months
Sausage, hard, dry (pepperoni), sliced 2-3 weeks 1-2 months
Poultry, Fresh
Chicken or turkey, whole 1-2 days 12 months
Chicken or turkey, parts 1-2 days 9 months
Duckling or goose, whole 1-2 days 6 months
Giblets 1-2 days 3-4 months
Poultry, Cooked or Processed
Chicken nuggets, patties 1-2 days 1-3 months
Cooked poultry dishes 3-4 days 4-6 months
Fried chicken 3-4 days 4 months
Ground turkey or chicken 1-2 days 3-4 months
Lunch meats, sealed in package 2 weeks 1-2 months
Lunch meats, after opening 3-5 days 1-2 months
Pieces covered with broth or gravy 1-2 days 6 months
Rotisserie chicken 3-4 days 4 months
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

Handy Tips

  • Wash produce under running water before preparation.
  • Raw fruit and vegetables can be held at room temperature, stored in the refrigerator or frozen. For most produce, refrigeration is the best way to maintain quality and delay ripening. There are, however, some exceptions:
  • Tomatoes taste best if not refrigerated as cold storage can cause them to become mealy.
  • Bananas should not be refrigerated unless fully ripe, and then they should be used within 1-2 days. Refrigeration will cause banana skin to blacken, but the fruit will not ripen while cold.
  • If they are very fresh, apples, mangoes, and stone fruits (plums, peaches, etc.) can be stored at room temperature, but these items should be refrigerated as they ripen.
  • Hardy vegetables like onions, garlic, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squash can be stored in cool, dark places outside of the cooler.
  • Once fruits and vegetables are cut, chopped or cooked, they should be placed in the refrigerator within two hours, or frozen in plastic freezer containers.
FruitsShelfRefrigeratorFreezer
Apples 1-2 days 3 weeks Cooked, 8 months
Apricots Until ripe 2-3 days Do not freeze
Avocados Until ripe 3-4 days Do not freeze
Bananas Until ripe 2 days, skin will blacken Whole peeled, 1 month
Berries, cherries 1-2 days 4 months
Citrus Fruit 10 days 1-2 weeks Do not freeze
Coconuts, fresh 1 week 2-3 weeks Shredded, 6 months
Grapes 1 day 1 week Whole, 1 month
Kiwi Fruit Until ripe 3-4 days Do not freeze
Melons 1-2 days 3-4 days Balls, 1 month
Papaya, mango 3-5 days 1 week Do not freeze
Peaches, nectarines Until ripe 3-4 days Sliced, lemon juice and and sugar, 2 months
Pears, Plums 3-5 days 3-4 days Do not freeze
VegetablesShelfRaw, RefrigFrozen*
Artichokes, whole 1-2 days 1-2 weeks Do not freeze
Asparagus 3-4 days 8 months
Beans, green or wax 3-4 days 8 months
Beets 1 day 7-10 days 6-8 months
Bok choy 2-3days 10-12 months
Broccoli, raab, rapini 3-5 days 10-12 months
Brussels sprouts 3-5 days 10-12 months
Cauliflower 3-5 days 10-12 months
Cabbage 1-2 weeks 10-12 months
Carrots, parsnips 3weeks 10-12 months
Celery 1-2 weeks 10-12 months
Corn on the cob 1-2 days 8 months
Cucumbers 4-5 days Do not freeze
Eggplant 1 day 3-4 days 6-8 months
Garlic 1 month 1-2 weeks 1 month
Ginger Root 1-2 days 1-2 weeks 1 month
Greens 1-2 days 10-12 months
Herbs, fresh 7-10 days 1-2 months
Leeks 1-2 weeks 10-12 months
Lettuce, iceberg 1-2 weeks Do not freeze
Lettuce, leaf 3-7 days Do not freeze
Mushrooms 2-3 days 10-12 months
Okra 2-3 days 10-12 months
Onions, dry 2-3 weeks 2 months 10-12 months
Spring or green 1-2 weeks 10-12 months
Parsley, cilantro 1 week 1-2 months
Peppers, bell or chili 4-5 days 6-8 months
Potatoes 1-2 months 1-2 weeks Cooked and mashed, 10-12 months
Radishes 10-14 days Do not freeze
Rutabagas 1week 2 weeks 8-10 months
Spinach 1-2 days 10-12 months
Squash, summer 4-5 days 10-12 months
Squash, winter 1 week 2 weeks 10-12 months
Turnips 2 weeks 8-10 months
Tomatoes Until ripe 2-3 days 2 months
Frozen food: Shelf Life After Coded Date
Frozen ItemsFreezerRefrigerator After Thawing
Bagels 2 months 1-2 weeks
Bread Dough, commercial Use-by date After baking, 4-7 days
Burritos, sandwiches 2 months 3-4 days
Egg substitutes 12 months Date on Carton
Fish, breaded 3-6 months Do not defrost. Cook frozen.
Fish, raw 6 months 1-2 days
Fruit such as berries, melons etc. 4-6 months 4-5 days
Guacamole 3-4 months 3-4 days
Ice cream 2-4 months
Juice concentrates 6-12 months 7-10 days
Lobster tails 3 months 2 days
Pancakes, Waffles 2 months 3-4 days
Sausages, uncooked 1-2 months 1-2 days
Sausages, precooked 1-2 months 1 week
Sherbet, sorbet 2-4 months
Shrimp, shellfish 12 months 1-2 days
Soy crumbles and hot dogs 9 months 3-4 days
Soy meat substitutes 12-18 months 3-4 days
Tempeh 12 months 1-2 weeks
Topping, whipped 6 months 2 weeks
TV Dinners, entrees, breakfast 3 months Do not defrost. Cook frozen.
Vegetables 8 months 3-4 days
Deli Food: Shelf Life After Coded Date

Handy Tips

  • As soon as you get home, immediately put cold cut perishables into the refrigerator or freezer.
  • Hot perishable foods from the deli department need to be kept at 60°C (140°F) or above, or consumed within two hours.
  • For hot deli foods to be eaten at a later time, place them in shallow, covered containers and refrigerate or freeze within two hours.
  • Reheat deli foods to 165º F.
Deli FoodsRefrigeratorFreezer
Main dishes or meals, hot or refrigerated 3-4 days 2-3 months
Meats covered with gravy or broth 1-2 days 6 months
Commercial brand vacuum packed dinners with USDA seal 2 weeks Does not freeze well
Chicken, rotisserie or fried 3-4 days 4 months
Luncheon meats, store sliced 3-5 days 1-2 months
Pate 1-2 days 1-2 months
Cheese, store-sliced, hard cheese such as cheddar or Swiss 3-4 weeks 6 months
Cheese, soft (such as brie, bel paese, goat cheese, fresh mozzarella) 1 week 6 months
Salads containing meat, fish, poultry or eggs 3-4 days Do not freeze
Salads, vegetable 3-5 days Do not freeze
Side dishes such as cooked vegetables, rice or potatoes 3-4 days 1-2 months
Olives 2weeks Do not freeze
Pudding Package date; 2 days after opening Do not freeze.
Fruit, cut Package date; 4 days after opening Do not freeze
Cheesecake 1 week 2-3 months
Shelf Stable Food: Shelf Life After Coded Date

Handy Tips

Shelf-stable foods such as canned goods, cereal, baking mixes, pasta, dry beans, mustard, ketchup and peanut butter can be kept safely at room temperature. To keep these foods at their best quality, store them in clean, dry, cool 29.4°C (85°F) cabinets away from the stove or the refrigerator's exhaust. Extremely hot over 37.7°C (100°F) and freezing temperatures are harmful to canned goods.

  • Low-acid canned goods - two to five years (canned meat and poultry, stews, soups except tomato, pasta products, potatoes, corn, carrots, spinach, beans, beets, peas and pumpkin).
  • High-acid canned goods - 12 to 18 months (tomato products, fruits, sauerkraut and foods in vinegar-based sauces or dressings).
  • Some canned hams are shelf-stable. Never store ham or any foods labeled "keep refrigerated" in the pantry. These foods must be stored in the refrigerator.

Many shelf-stable foods remain edible for several weeks, or even months, after opening, as the accompanying chart indicates. However, be sure to read package labels as some items must be refrigerated after opening.

Shelf Stable FoodsUnopened in PantryRefrigerator After OpeningIn Pantry After Opening
Baby food, jars or cans, fruits and vegetables Use-by date 2-3 days
Baby food, meats and eggs Use-by date 1 day
Baby food, cereal, dry mixes Use-by date 2 months
Baby food, Formula Use-by date 1-2 days
Bacon Bits, Imitation 4 months Refer to jar 4 months
Beans, Dried 12 months 12 months
Canned goods, low acid (such as meat, poultry, fish, gravy, stew, soups, beans, carrots, corn, pasta, peas, potatoes, spinach) 2-5 years 3-4 days
Canned goods, high acid (such as juices, fruit, pickles, sauerkraut, tomato soup, and foods in vinegar-based sauce) 12-18 months 5-7 days
Cereal, ready-to-eat 6-12 months 3 months
Cereal, Cook before eating (oatmeal, etc.) 12 months 6-12 months
Coffee, whole beans 1-3 weeks (For all types; 3-4 months frozen; 2 weeks refrigerated 1 week
Coffee, non-vacuum bag ground, in cans 2 years For all types; 3-4 months frozen; 2 weeks refrigerated 1 week
Coffee, instant, jars and tins 12 months For all types; 3-4 months frozen; 2 weeks refrigerated 2-3 months
Baking Ingredients
Baking powder 6 months 3 months
Baking soda 18 months 6 months
Biscuit or pancake mix 15 months Pkg use-by date
Cakes, Brownies, Bread Mixes 12-18 months
Cornmeal, regular, degerminated 6-12 months 12 months
Cornmeal, stone ground or blue 1 month 2-3 months
Cornstarch 18 months 18 months
Flour, white 6-12 months 6-8 months
Flour, whole wheat 1 month 6-8 months
Frosting, canned 10 months 1 week
Frosting mixes 12 months 3 months
Chocolate,unsweetened and semi-sweet, solid 18-24 months 1 year
Chocolate syrup 2 years 6 months
Cocoa and Cocoa Mixes Indefinitely 1 year
Condiments
Barbecue sauce, bottled 12 months 4 months 1 month
Ketchup, Cocktail or Chili sauce 12 months 6 months 1 month
Chutney 12 months 1-2 months
Horseradish, in jar 12 months 3-4 months
Mayonnaise, commercial 2-3 months 2 months 1 month
Mustard 12 months 12 months
Olives, black and green 12-18 months 2 weeks
Pickles 12 months 1-2 weeks
Salad Dressings, commercial, bottled 10-12 months 3 months
Salsa, picante and taco sauces 12 months 1 month
Cookies, packaged 2 months 8-12 months frozen 4 weeks
Crackers 8 months Freeze or refrigerate 3-4 months 1 month
Shelf Stable FoodsUnopened in PantryRefrigerator After OpeningIn Pantry After Opening
Diet powder mixes 6 months 3 months
Extracts, vanilla, 3 years 1 year
Fruits, dried 6 months 6 months 1 month
Garlic, chopped 18 months Refrigerate; use by date on jar
Garlic, commercial jars 3 years Refrigerate; use by date on jar
Gelatin, flavored 18 months Use all or reseal for 3-4 months
Gelatin, unflavored 3 years Use all or reseal for 3-4 months
Gravy, jars and cans 2-5 years 1-2 days Use entire can
Gravy, dry mixes 2 years 1-2 days Mix entire packet
Herbs, dried 1-2 years Cool, dark place
Honey 12 months 12 months
Jams, jellies, preserves 12 months 6months
Jerky, commercially dried 12 months 2-3 months
Jerky, homemade 1-2 months 1-2 months
Juice, boxes 4-6 months 8-12 days
Lentils, dried 12 months 12 months
Marshmallows, Marshmallow creme 2-4 months 1 month
Milk, canned evaporated 12 months 4-5 days
Molasses 12 months 6 months
Mushrooms, dried 6 months 3 months
Oils, olive or vegetable 6 months 4 months 1-3 months
Nuts oils 6 months
Vegetable oil sprays 2 years 1 year
Nuts, jars or cans 12 months Refrigerate 4-6 months. Freeze 9-12 months 1 month
Pasta, dry, without eggs 2 years 1 year
Dry egg noodles 2 years 1-2 months
Peanut butter 6-9 months 2-3 months
Peas, dried split 12 months 12 months
Pectin Use by pkg. date 1 month
Popcorn, dry kernels in a jar 2 years 1 year
Popcorn, commercially popped in bags 2-3 months 1-2 weeks
Popcorn, microwave packets 12 months 1-2 days popped
Potato chips`` 2 months 1-2 weeks
Potatoes, instant 6-12 months 6-12 months
Pudding mixes 12 months 3-4 months
Rice, white or wild 2 years 6 months 1 year
Brown Rice 1 year 6 months 1 year
Rice, flavored or herb mixes 6 months 6 months Use all
Sauce mixes, nondairy (spaghetti, taco, etc.) 2 years Use entire amount
Cream sauces, milk solids 1 year
Shortening, solid 8 months 3 months
Diet sodas, bottles or cans 3 months. after date 2-3 days 1 week
Regular sodas, bottles 3 months. after date 2-3 days 2 weeks
Regular sodas, cans 9 months after date
Soup mixes, dry bouillon 12 months 12 months
Spaghetti Sauce in jars 18 months 4 days
Spices, whole 2-4 years total Included in total
Spices, ground 2-3 years total Included in total
Paprika, red pepper, and chili powder 2 years total Store in refrigerator Included in total
Sugar, brown 4 months Sugar never spoils
Sugar, granulated 2 years Sugar never spoils
Sugar, confectioners 18 months Sugar never spoils
Sugar substitutes 2 years Sugar never spoils
Syrup, pancake 12 months 12 months
Syrup, genuine or real maple 12 months 12 months
Tapioca 12 months 12 months
Tea, bags 18 months 12 months
Tea, loose 2 years 6-12 months
Tea, instant 3 years 6-12 months
Toaster pastries, fruit filled 6 months Keep foil packets sealed
Toaster pastries, non-fruit fillings 9 months Keep foil packets sealed
Tomatoes, sun dried, packed in oil 12 months 6-12 months 3-6 months
Packed in cellophane 9 months 6-12 months 3-6 months
Vinegar 2 years 12 months
Yeast, dry, packets and jars Use by date Refrigerate open jars
Water, bottled 1-2 years 3 months
Worcestershire Sauce 1 year 1 year
Soy Products
Soy or rice beverage, Shelf stable 3 months or use-by date 7-10 days
Soy beverage powders 6 months 3-4 months
Soy flour, de-fatted, low-fat 1 year 1 year
Soy flour, full-fat 2 months 6 months
Textured soy protein (TSP) 2 years 3-4 months
Re-hydrated TSP 3-4 months 3-4 days
Shelf Stable Food: Bakery Items
Bakery Items Shelf Refrigerator Freezer

Refrigerate any cake with frosting made of dairy products or eggs. Any breads containing meat, hard cooked eggs, custard filling or other perishable ingredients must be refrigerated within two hours.

Bread, commercial 2-4 days 7-14 days 3 months
Bread, flat (tortillas, pita) 2-4 days 4-7 days 4 months
Cakes, angel food 1-2 days 1 week 2 months
Cakes, chiffon, sponge 1-2 days 1 week 2 months
Cakes, chocolate 1-2 days 1 week 4 months
Cakes, fruit cake 1 month 6 months 12 months
Cakes, made from mix 3-4 days 1 week 4 months
Cakes, pound cake 3-4 days 1 week 6 months
Cheesecake 1 week 2-3 months
Cookies, bakery or homemade 2-3 weeks 2 months 8-12 months
Croissants, butter 1 day 1 week 2 months
Doughnuts, glazed or cake 1-2 days 1 week 1 month
Doughnuts, dairy cream filled 3-4 days
Eclairs, dairy cream filled 3-4 days
Muffins 1-2 days 1 week 2 months
Pastries, danish 1-2 days 1 week 2 months
Pies, cream 3-4 days
Pies, chiffon 1-2 days
Pies, fruit 1-2 days 1 week 8 months
Pies, mincemeat 2 hours 1 week 8 months
Pies, pecan 2 hours 3-4 days 1-2 months
Pies, pumpkin 2 hours 3-4 days 1-2 months
Quiche 2 hours 3-4 days 2 months
Rolls, yeast, baked 3-4 days 1 week 2 months
Rolls, yeast, partially baked Package date 1 week 2 months
Rolls, filled, meat or vegetables 2 hours 3-4 days 2 months
Continued below image.
Illustration of two male and two female chefs and cooks.
Illustration of two male and two female chefs and cooks.
Continued...

Handling Food Safely

Many cases of food borne illness occur each year due to improper handling of food in the home. Microorganisms multiply rapidly at temperatures between 4.4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F). Unfortunately, the harmful bacteria that cause most cases of food borne illness cannot be seen,smelled or tasted. It is important to:

Keeping Food Safe During Power Outages

Refrigerator

Refrigerated foods should be edible as long as power is out no more than four hours. Discard any perishable foods that have been above 4.4°C (40°F) for two hours or more, and any food that has an unusual odor, color, or texture, or feels warm to the touch. If you have any doubts about the safety of any item in your refrigerator after power is restored, it's best to err on the side of caution and discard it.

Freezer

Even when the power is off, a full freezer will stay frozen for about two days; a half-full freezer about one day. So keep the freezer door closed. If you think power will be out for several days, locate some block ice, bags of ice or dry ice to put in the freezer along with your refrigerated perishable food, or keep the food continually iced in an insulated cooler. You can also pack foods tightly together to insulate one another.

All thawed raw or cooked foods can be refrozen if they still contain ice crystals or are 4.4°C (40°F) or below, but there may be some quality loss. Foods thawed and held above 4.4°C (40°F) for more than two hours should be discarded.

Storing Canned and Boxed Food

Food from Cans and Jars

Do not consume food from cans or jars if:

Boxed Foods

Do not consume food from boxes if:

Interesting Related Information

Related Publications

Share This Information To:
𝕏.com Facebook Reddit

Page Information, Citing and Disclaimer

Disabled World is an independent disability community founded in 2004 to provide news and information to people with disabilities, seniors, their family and carers. We'd love for you to follow and connect with us on social media!

Cite This Page (APA): Langtree, I. C. (2024, June 30). Food Storage Duration Guide: Refrigerated, Frozen, and Pantry Produce. Disabled World. Retrieved July 17, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/fitness/cooking/food-storage-guide.php

Permalink: <a href="https://www.disabled-world.com/fitness/cooking/food-storage-guide.php">Food Storage Duration Guide: Refrigerated, Frozen, and Pantry Produce</a>: Comprehensive guide detailing recommended storage durations for food items, including frozen goods, refrigerated products, packaged foods, and common household staples.

Disabled World provides general information only. Materials presented are never meant to substitute for qualified medical care. Any 3rd party offering or advertising does not constitute an endorsement.