Light Weights, Big Gains: The Surprising Truth About Muscle Building

Weight and Strength Training

Author: McMaster University
Published: 2010/08/12 - Updated: 2024/07/10
Publication Type: Findings - Peer-Reviewed: Yes
Contents: Summary - Introduction - Main - Related

Synopsis: Study finds muscle building can be achieved by using lighter weights to pump iron until you reach muscle fatigue. The study used light weights that represented a percentage of what the subjects could lift. The heavier weights were set to 90% of a person's best lift and the light weights at a mere 30% of what people could lift. The study data has significance for people with compromised skeletal muscle mass, such as the elderly, patients with cancer, or those who are recovering from trauma, surgery or even stroke.

Introduction

Current gym dogma holds that to build muscle size you need to lift heavy weights. However, a new study conducted at McMaster University has shown that a similar degree of muscle building can be achieved by using lighter weights. The secret is to pump iron until you reach muscle fatigue.

Main Digest

The findings are published in PLoS ONE.

"Rather than grunting and straining to lift heavy weights, you can grab something much lighter but you have to lift it until you can't lift it anymore," says Stuart Phillips, associate professor of kinesiology at McMaster University. "We're convinced that growing muscle means stimulating your muscle to make new muscle proteins, a process in the body that over time accumulates into bigger muscles."

Phillips praised lead author and senior Ph.D. student Nicholas Burd for masterminding the project that showed it's really not the weight that you lift but the fact that you get muscular fatigue that's the critical point in building muscle.

The study used light weights that represented a percentage of what the subjects could lift. The heavier weights were set to 90% of a person's best lift and the light weights at a mere 30% of what people could lift.

"It's a very light weight," says Phillips noting that the 90-80% range is usually something people can lift from 5-10 times before fatigue sets in. At 30%, Burd reported that subjects could lift that weight at least 24 times before they felt fatigue.

"We're excited to see where this new paradigm will lead," says Phillips, adding that these new data have practical significance for gym enthusiasts but more importantly for people with compromised skeletal muscle mass, such as the elderly, patients with cancer, or those who are recovering from trauma, surgery or even stroke.

Attribution/Source(s):

This peer reviewed publication was selected for publishing by the editors of Disabled World due to its significant relevance to the disability community. Originally authored by McMaster University, and published on 2010/08/12 (Edit Update: 2024/07/10), the content may have been edited for style, clarity, or brevity. For further details or clarifications, McMaster University can be contacted at mcmaster.ca. NOTE: Disabled World does not provide any warranties or endorsements related to this article.

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Cite This Page (APA): McMaster University. (2010, August 12 - Last revised: 2024, July 10). Light Weights, Big Gains: The Surprising Truth About Muscle Building. Disabled World. Retrieved July 16, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/fitness/exercise/bodybuilding/weightlifting-muscle.php

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