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Frequent Sauna Use Study Shows Less Cardiovascular Events and All-cause Mortality

  • Date: 2015/02/25
  • The JAMA Network Journals - Jari A. Laukkanen - jariantero.laukkanen@uef.fi
  • Synopsis : New study suggests men who engaged in frequent sauna use had reduced risks of fatal cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality.

Main Document

A sauna may do more than just make you sweat. A new study suggests men who engaged in frequent sauna use had reduced risks of fatal cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

A small room or building designed as a place to experience dry or wet heat sessions, or an establishment with one or more of these and auxiliary facilities. The steam and high heat make the bathers perspire. Saunas can be divided into two basic styles: conventional saunas that warm the air or infrared saunas that warm objects. Infrared saunas may use various materials in their heating area such as charcoal, active carbon fibers, and other materials.

Although some studies have found sauna bathing to be associated with better cardiovascular and circulatory function, the association between regular sauna bathing and risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and fatal cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is not known.

Jari A. Laukkanen, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, and coauthors investigated the association between sauna bathing and the risk of SCD, fatal coronary heart disease (CHD), fatal CVD and all-cause mortality in a group of 2,315 middle-aged men (42 to 60 years old) from eastern Finland.

Results show:

  • During a median (midpoint) follow-up of nearly 21 years, there were 190 SCDs, 281 fatal CHDs, 407 fatal CVDs and 929 deaths from all causes.
  • Compared with men who reported one sauna bathing session per week, the risk of SCD was 22 percent lower for 2 to 3 sauna bathing sessions per week and 63 percent lower for 4 to 7 sauna sessions per week.
  • The risk of fatal CHD events was 23 percent lower for 2 to 3 bathing sessions per week and 48 percent lower for 4 to 7 sauna sessions per week compared to once a week.
  • CVD death also was 27 percent lower for men who took saunas 2 to 3 times a week and 50 percent lower for men who were in the sauna 4 to 7 times a week compared with men who indulged just once per week.
  • For all-cause mortality, sauna bathing 2 to 3 times per week was associated with a 24 percent lower risk and 4 to 7 times per week with a 40 percent reduction in risk compared to only one sauna session per week.

The amount of time spent in the sauna seemed to matter too.

Compared with men who spent less than 11 minutes in the sauna, the risk of SCD was 7 percent lower for sauna sessions of 11 to 19 minutes and 52 percent less for sessions lasting more than 19 minutes. Similar associations were seen for fatal CHDs and fatal CVDs but not for all-cause mortality events.

"Further studies are warranted to establish the potential mechanism that links sauna bathing and cardiovascular health," the study concludes.

Editor's Note: Health Benefits of Sauna Bathing

In a related Editor's Note, Rita F. Redberg, M.D., of the University of California, San Francisco, and editor-in-chief of JAMA Internal Medicine, writes:

"Although we do not know why the men who took saunas more frequently had greater longevity (whether it is the time spent in the hot room, the relaxation time, the leisure of a life that allows for more relaxation time or the camaraderie of the sauna), clearly time spent in the sauna is time well spent."

Quick Facts:

A sauna may help rheumatic pain (with cold shower) but not neuropathic pain, and has also shown usefulness for appetite loss and mild depression. It has also been recommended for reducing symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, and rheumatoid arthritis, and for anorexia nervosa, and been proposed for treatment of other conditions including glaucoma, Sjogren syndrome, and obstructive lung disease, and for recuperation after childbirth. Many of the sauna therapeutic trials used a regular schedule of at least 5 days a week and often daily for one to three months, then several times a week for extended periods.


Calories: Some people claim that there are anywhere from 300 to 1000 calories burned in a sauna session of 30 minutes, however you're really only losing water weight from sweating. According to the Mayo Clinic's health education website, your body composition, sex, and age are determining factors on how many calories you burn during any given day, even when you are resting; this is known as your basal metabolic rate (BMR). A person weighing around 160 lbs. will burn burn about 300 calories during a 30-minute session in the sauna. That number changes based on your individual BMR, in addition to the temperature settings in the sauna and the amount of time you spend in the heat.



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