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Brain Foods - What You Eat Affects Your Brain

  • Synopsis: Published: 2010-11-27 - Article examines foods and exercises in order to maintain a health brain in middle age and senior years. For further information pertaining to this article contact: Dr. Lorne S. Label, Brain Longevity Center.

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Making healthy food choices is important at any age. New medical evidence shows that what you feed your body directly affects your brain.

A "brain healthy" diet means low-fat, low cholesterol choices combined with an abundance of antioxidant foods that are beneficial to the brain. Better nutrition will be good for your heart and your mind.

Many people start out the day with supplements. While it is probably a good idea to take a daily multivitamin to give our bodies a little extra boost, popping a pill is no substitute for a well-rounded, healthy diet.

Studies have shown that most of us do not get enough protein rich foods, and when we do consume protein it is usually later in the day. Scientists know that adequate proteins are vital to having an optimum thinking process, and a protein-based meal in the middle of the day will optimize your mental performance.

But doesn't protein usually include fat, which is bad for you

Yes, but not all fats are created equal. While it is true that we want to limit the saturated fats that are found in red meats and animal products, you can replace these "bad fats" with Omega-3 fatty acids - also called "essential fats" - which help keep the brain operating at its peak.

In fact, Omega-3 fats are so important to a good diet that a severe lack of these good fats can lead to depression, poor memory, low IQ, learning disabilities, dyslexia, ADD and many more mental disorders.

To ensure that your diet is rich in Omega-3 fats, eat plenty of oily, cold-water fish like wild salmon, sardines, whitefish, trout, tuna, herring, sable fish, mackerel and anchovies. Ask your doctor if you should also take an Omega-3 supplement on a daily basis.

While the goal is to increase the Omega-3s in your diet, you also want to decrease the intake of trans-fats - sometimes called trans fatty acids or hydrogenated vegetable oils. Found in many processed foods, trans-fats will pack on the pounds and provide absolutely no nutrition for your body. They are empty calories, so whenever possible, choose fresh foods over processed.

Carbohydrates that have been refined and processed are also considered a brain drain.

Your body will benefit if you limit the "bad" carbohydrates, such as refined white sugar and high-sugar sweetened drinks.

Foods with high sugar content also have a high glycemic index, which means they adversely affect the body by causing a spike and then a sudden drop in the blood glucose and insulin levels. So the next time you are tempted to substitute a muffin, donut or pastry for a healthy meal, remember that your body and your brain both need high quality foods that provide fuel for the body and brain.

But the body does need "brain booster" carbohydrates found in whole grains, fruits and vegetables.

In fact, your mother was right when she extolled the virtues of eating your vegetables. Even better advice is to consume both fruits and vegetables - with an emphasis on brightly colored fresh foods.

Focus on a diet rich in fresh fruits and dark leafy vegetables and strive for at least 4-5 servings daily.

Vegetables and fruits are packed with antioxidants and many essential vitamins and minerals. Plus, they are low in fat and calories. Choose foods such as kale, spinach, Brussels sprouts, alfalfa sprouts, collard greens, broccoli, beets, red bell pepper, onion, corn, soybeans, eggplant and dark green lettuces. Your brain will benefit from eating fruits with high antioxidant levels including prunes, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, raspberries, plums, oranges, red grapes and cherries.

What other advice would Mom recommend

Eat in moderation. Your body has to work in overdrive to digest a huge meal, so smaller meals eaten more often is a better choice.

Nuts, also in moderation, can be a useful part of your diet. A handful of almonds, pecans and walnuts will all provide a good source of vitamin E, an antioxidant. Drink plenty of fluids (six 8 oz. glasses a day) and make sure that a good portion is water. Limit caffeine and alcohol, although a glass of red wine daily (check with your doctor) can actually be helpful, due to the resveratrol found in dark red wines. Green tea is an excellent substitute for coffee.

The goal with good nutrition is to have a healthier body and mind. Your brain will benefit from a well-balanced diet and improved food choices. When in doubt, choose fresh options, read the labels and consult with your physician or a nutritionist.

Challenge, Exercise and Feed Your Brain

Just like the rest of your body, your brain needs to be well-cared for in order to function at its highest level. For example, your memory will be sharper if you practice a daily regimen that includes a challenging cognitive workout. Your body and your brain will both benefit from a varied exercise routine. And, if you incorporate good nutritional habits, this also helps the brain to flourish.

Here are some tips on how to challenge, exercise and feed your brain.

Exercises for Good Brain Health

When most people think of exercise, they envision working out to keep their bodies physically fit and healthy. But the brain - so important to living a full life - also needs an exercise regimen to stay agile and alert.

What can you do to challenge your brain

Activities like crossword puzzles, card games, reading, volunteering and Sudoku puzzles will stimulate thought and cause you to retain information and problem-solve. Even planning a vacation or attending a class will require the brain to process new information.

More challenging activities might include mastering a foreign language, learning a new computer program or taking music lessons.

Numerous computer programs and books feature "brain games" that will give you a systematic mental workout. Customizing these games optimizes the effectiveness. The key is to have differing levels of intensity and difficulty to keep the mind engaged and working.

There are also simple exercises that don't require a book, computer or even pen and paper. Try this: While waiting in line at the bank, count to 100 by factors of three. If that's too easy, then go backward. Run through the multiplication and division tables in your head. Another easy brain stretch is to use your non-dominant hand while doing daily tasks. You might find this frustrating at first, but you will be amazed at the results.

Whatever activities you choose, make sure that you have to work your brain, causing it to be used in non-routine ways. This stretching process will help create stronger memories that will provide for clearer overall thinking.

Physical Exercise Benefits the Body and the Brain

Scientists used to believe that people were stuck with the brain they were born with - and that individuals naturally began to lose cognitive function as they aged. This thinking allowed people to accept memory loss as inevitable and believe that nothing could be done about it.

However, new research shows that the brain constantly renews itself, giving hope to those with cognitive decline.

Recent research also reveals that frequent physical exercise has a direct correlation to brain function. Exercise stimulates stem cells to grow new brain cells in the memory part of the brain. Enhancing blood flow to the brain increases the density and size of the brain's capillaries, which in turn increases the amount of oxygen to the brain.

The evidence is clear: Your body can get flabby from lack of movement and so can your brain.

Studies show that a vigorous exercise program - one that gets the heart pumping fast - causes more blood flow to the brain, thereby providing the most benefits. However, any exercise is good, so take a walk, work in your garden, lift weights and generally just get moving. The more you do the better.

Adding complexity to the exercise program, such as learning new dance steps, also helps the brain since it combines both physical and mental stimulation. So, you can help fine-tune your mental sharpness by varying your physical activities and by trying something new.

Finally, it's never too late to begin exercising.

If you have trouble committing to a consistent workout program, then partner up with a spouse, family member or friend. You will be more apt to stick with a program if there is another person counting on you. Brain Foods for Better Health Weight management and good nutrition are both essential to good health. In fact, new medical evidence indicates that a poor diet contributes to brain cell damage - so what you feed your body directly affects your brain.

A "brain healthy" diet means low-fat, low cholesterol choices combined with an abundance of antioxidant foods. What's good for you and what should you avoid

Eat fresh foods, rather than highly processed foods. Drink plenty of fluids (six 8 oz. glasses a day) and make sure that a good portion is water. Limit any caffeine and alcohol.

Include colorful fruits and vegetables in your diet and strive for at least 4-5 servings daily. Choose foods such as kale, spinach, Brussels sprouts, alfalfa sprouts, broccoli, beets, red bell pepper, onion, corn, eggplant and dark green lettuces. Fruits with high antioxidant levels include prunes, raisins, blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, raspberries, plums, oranges, red grapes and cherries.

In moderation, nuts - like almonds, pecans and walnuts - can be a good source of vitamin E, an antioxidant.

Lycopene increases the blood antioxidant capacity, so foods like tomatoes, tomato products and V8 juice are all good choices.

Most people do not consume enough protein. Opt for proteins found in cold-water fish, like tuna, wild salmon, herring, trout, sardines and whitefish. Conversely reduce saturated fats - such as red meats and animal products, and replace these "bad fats" with the monounsaturated fats in olive, canola, sunflower, safflower and soybean oils.

Decrease the intake of trans-fats (also called Trans fatty acids or hydrogenated vegetable oils) which are found in many processed foods.

Avoid high glycemic or simple carbohydrate foods that are really just empty calories. Sodas, sweetened drinks, cakes, cookies and other sugary snacks will give you an initial energy boast, but they will cause your blood sugar to fall dramatically which places stress on the body.

The goal is to have a healthier body and mind. Your brain will benefit from a well-balanced diet and improved food choices. When in doubt, choose fresh options, read the labels and consult with your physician or a nutritionist.

Reference: Dr. Lorne S. Label is director of the Brain Longevity Center in Thousand Oaks. The Brain Longevity Center offers proactive programs for those with mild-to-moderate dementia and others seeking to maintain a healthy brain as they age. For information call 805-497-7274 or visit us online at www.brainlc.com.



Related:

  1. Definitions of Human Brain Components
  2. Human Brain Facts and Answers



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