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I Feel Your Pain: Neural Mechanisms of Empathy

Synopsis: Study uses brain imaging technique to see if possible to share pain observed in others provides insight into brain mechanisms involved in empathy.1

Author: Cell Press

Published: 2009-01-28 Updated: 2015-09-09

Main Digest

Is it possible to share a pain that you observe in another but have never actually experienced yourself. A new study uses a sophisticated brain-imaging technique to try and answer this question. The research, published by Cell Press provides insight into brain mechanisms involved in empathy.

Brain-imaging studies have shown similar patterns of brain activity when subjects feel their own emotions or observe the same emotions in others. It has been suggested that a person who has never experienced a specific feeling would have a difficult time directly empathizing with a person through a "mirror matching" mechanism that requires previous experience and would instead have to rely on a higher inferential processes called "perspective taking."

"Patients with congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) offer a unique opportunity to test this model of empathy by exploring how the lack of self-pain representation might influence the perception of others' pain," explains lead author Dr. Nicolas Danziger from the Department of Clinical Neurophysiology and Pain Center at the Pitie-Salpetriere in Paris, France.

Dr. Danziger and colleagues had previously shown that CIP patients underestimated the pain of others when emotional cues were lacking and, in contrast with control subjects, the ability to fully acknowledge others' pain depended on a capacity for empathy.

In this study, the researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare brain activation patterns in CIP patients and controls who were asked to imagine the feelings of a person in a photo that showed body parts in painful situations or facial expressions of pain.

CIP patients showed decreased fMRI activation of visual regions, a result indicative of their reduced emotional arousal to the view of others' pain. On the other hand, in the CIP patients but not the controls, the capacity for empathy strongly predicted activation of key mid-line brain structures involved in processes linked to inferring the emotional states of others.

These results suggest that in the absence of functional resonance mechanisms shaped by personal pain experiences, CIP patients might rely crucially on their empathetic abilities to imagine the pain of others, with activation of mid line brain structures being the neural signature of this cognitive-emotional process.

"Our findings underline the major role of mid-line structures in emotional perspective taking and in the ability to understand someone else's feelings despite the lack of any previous personal experience of it an empathetic challenge frequently raised during human social interactions," concludes Dr. Danziger.

Reference:

The researcher is Nicolas Danziger, INSERM U713, Paris, France; Isabelle Faillenot, CHU Saint-Etienne, 42100 France; INSERM 342 F-69003 UCB Lyon1 University, Lyon, France; INSERM 342 F42000 and UJM St-Etienne University, St Etienne, France; and Roland Peyron, CHU Saint-Etienne, 42100 France; INSERM 342 F-69003 UCB Lyon1 University, Lyon, France; INSERM 342 F42000 and UJM St-Etienne University, St Etienne, France, CERMEP, Lyon, France.

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Cite Page: Journal: Disabled World. Language: English (U.S.). Author: Cell Press. Electronic Publication Date: 2009-01-28. Last Revised Date: 2015-09-09. Reference Title: I Feel Your Pain: Neural Mechanisms of Empathy, Source: <a href=https://www.disabled-world.com/health/pain/neural-empathy.php>I Feel Your Pain: Neural Mechanisms of Empathy</a>. Abstract: Study uses brain imaging technique to see if possible to share pain observed in others provides insight into brain mechanisms involved in empathy. Retrieved 2021-02-28, from https://www.disabled-world.com/health/pain/neural-empathy.php - Reference Category Number: DW#50-536.