Screen Readers Skip to Content

Aspirin: General Information, Facts and Warnings

Published : 2010-10-04 - Updated : 2020-10-04
Author : Disabled World - Contact: Disabled World (www.disabled-world.com)

Synopsis* : Facts and information regarding aspirin including ingredients aspirin is made from and recommended daily dosage. An over the counter medication, aspirin is typically used to reduce swelling, redness, pain, and fever, caused by various problems such as arthritis, infections, and headaches. While, aspirin works well to relieve pain and has been shown to reduce instances of stroke, heart attack, and even some cancers, you need to make sure you know the downsides of taking aspirin as well.

Main Digest

Aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is a salicylate drug often used as an analgesic to relieve minor aches and pains, antipyretic to reduce fever, and as an anti-inflammatory.

Aspirin has been used to reduce pain and inflammation for over a century. Evidence is rapidly growing that supports aspirin's use in lowering the rates of heart attacks, stroke, colon cancer and even Alzheimer's disease. The main undesirable side effects of aspirin are gastrointestinal distress, including stomach ulcers and bleeding, and tinnitus, especially in higher doses.

Aspirin Uses

An over the counter medication, aspirin is typically used to reduce swelling, redness, pain, and fever, caused by various problems such as arthritis, infections, and headaches. In some cases, a physician will prescribe aspirin as a method for treating gout. Various studies have shown that aspirin can prevent blood clots as well as a stroke or heart attack. Some studies conducted have shown that aspirin can also work in preventing some forms of cancers.

Aspirin comes in several forms powders, tablets, suppositories, chewable tablets, capsules, and extended-release tablets. While it is an over the counter medication, readily available for use, if your physician prescribes aspirin for your treatment, you will need to take it exactly as prescribed.

While, aspirin works well to relieve pain and has been shown to reduce instances of stroke, heart attack, and even some cancers, you need to make sure you know the downsides of taking aspirin as well. Some people develop severe allergies to aspirin, which include ibuprofen, and should be discussed with your physician.

Clipart image of pill container and 3 aspirin alongside it.
Clipart image of pill container and 3 aspirin alongside it.

Aspirin Facts

Aspirin officially has a place in the Smithsonian Institute and is a mainstay in just about every family's medicine cabinet and first aid kit.

A recent study suggests as many as one percent of air travelers suffer from deep vein thrombosis (DVT) due to prolonged sitting during long flights. It's been suggested that a low-dose aspirin taken before traveling any distance longer than four hours can reduce the potential for DVT.

A daily low-dose aspirin therapy is commonly prescribed to adults to prevent heart attack and stroke and help improve blood flow to the heart. The National Heart Foundation reports that patients who took low-dose aspirin had a 26% reduction in the risk of a non fatal heart attack, 25% reduction in the risk of stroke and 13% reduction in the risk of death compared to similar patients who didn't take aspirin. In the event a heart attack or stroke does occur, taken immediately, aspirin can reduce their severity.

Fast Absorbing Aspirin

Look for a product that dissolves in the mouth instead of the stomach. This allows the aspirin to enter the blood stream within three to five minutes versus the 30 minutes to an hour for regular aspirin, quickly inhibiting platelet aggregation (blood thinning).

Dosage of Aspirin

For adults doses of 300 to 1000 mg are generally taken four times a day for fever or arthritis, with a maximum dose of 4000 mg (4 grams) a day. The correct dose of aspirin depends on the disease or condition that is being treated.

For the prevention of myocardial infarction in someone with documented or suspected coronary artery disease, doses as low as 75 mg daily (or possibly even lower) are sufficient.

Cautions and Side Effects

As with all medications, aspirin has some side effects. Common side effects include stomach pain, vomiting, or nausea. Severe side effects includes ringing of the ears, hearing loss, black or bloody stools, skin rash, drowsiness, confusion, dizziness, or breathing issues. Any of these severe side effects are cause to immediately contact your physician.

About Us

Disabled World is an independent disability community established in 2004 to provide disability news and information to people with disabilities, seniors, and their family and/or carers. See our homepage for informative reviews, exclusive stories and how-tos. You can connect with us on social media such as Twitter and Facebook or learn more about Disabled World on our about us page.

*Disclaimer: Disabled World provides general information only. Materials presented are in no way meant to be a substitute for professional medical care by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such. Any 3rd party offering or advertising on disabled-world.com does not constitute endorsement by Disabled World. View our Advertising Policy for further information. Please report outdated or inaccurate information to us.

Cite Page: Journal: Disabled World. Language: English (U.S.). Author: Disabled World. Electronic Publication Date: 2010-10-04 - Revised: 2020-10-04. Title: Aspirin: General Information, Facts and Warnings, Source: <a href=https://www.disabled-world.com/medical/pharmaceutical/aspirin.php>Aspirin: General Information, Facts and Warnings</a>. Retrieved 2021-06-13, from https://www.disabled-world.com/medical/pharmaceutical/aspirin.php - Reference: DW#269-13885.