Skip to main content

Left-handed? Slender Face Identified as Marker for Left-Handedness

  • Published: 2017-04-27 : University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine (uw.edu).
  • Synopsis: Study reveals people with a slender lower face are about 25% more likely to be left-handed
Handedness

There are four types of handedness: left-handedness, right-handedness, mixed-handedness, and ambidexterity.

  • Ambilevous or ambisinister - People demonstrate awkwardness with both hands.
  • Cross-dominance or Mixed-handedness - The change of hand preference between tasks. This is common in the population with about a 1% prevalence.
  • Right-handed - People are more skillful with their right hands when performing tasks. Studies suggest that 88–92% of the world population is right-handed.
  • Ambidexterity - Exceptionally rare, although it can be learned. A truly ambidextrous person is able to do any task equally well with either hand. Those who learn it still tend to favor their originally dominant hand.
  • Left-handedness - Far less common than right-handedness. Left-handed people are more skillful with their left hands when performing tasks. Studies suggest that approximately 10% of the world population is left-handed.

Main Document

Quote: "Almost 2,000 years ago a Greek physician was first to identify slender jaws as a marker for TB susceptibility, and he turned out to be right!"

Individuals with a slender lower face are about 25 percent more likely to be left-handed. This unexpected finding (abstract) was identified in 13,536 individuals who participated in three national surveys conducted in the United States.

This association may shed new light on the origins of left-handedness, as slender jaws have also been associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis, a disease that has shaped human evolution and which today affects 2 billion people.

The finding was published April 26 in the journal Laterality: Asymmetries of Body, Brain and Cognition. The author, Philippe Hujoel, is a professor at the University of Washington School of Dentistry and an adjunct professor of epidemiology at its School of Public Health.

Slender jaws are a common facial feature, affecting about one in five U.S. adolescents.

Slender faces are also associated with overbites and left-handedness. Image Courtesy of Philippe Hujoel.
About This Image: Slender faces are also associated with overbites and left-handedness. Image Courtesy of Philippe Hujoel.
Past U.S. surveys measured the prevalence of this condition by evaluating how the upper and lower teeth come together. People with slender jaws typically have a lower jaw which bites a bit backward, giving them a convex facial profile and what's commonly called an overbite.

"Almost 2,000 years ago a Greek physician was first to identify slender jaws as a marker for TB susceptibility, and he turned out to be right!" Hujoel said. "Twentieth-century studies confirmed his clinical observations, as slender facial features became recognized as one aspect of a slender physique of a TB-susceptible person. The low body weight of this slender physique is still today recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a marker for TB susceptibility."

He said the finding raises the hypothesis that the genetics that shape facial features and tuberculosis susceptibility also increase the likelihood for left-handedness.

Such a hypothesis may explain curious geographical coincidences.

For example, the United Kingdom was described as the tuberculosis capital of Western Europe, and has a high prevalence of left-handedness and people with slender faces. Other populations, such as the Eskimos, were in the 19th century described as tuberculosis-resistant, having robust facial features, and typically depicted in art as showing right-hand dominance with tools and instruments.

Whether this is more than a coincidence needs further exploration, Hujoel said.

In the early 20th century, slender individuals were described as "ectomorphs" - a term that persists in popular culture as a reference to dieting and bodybuilding, Hujoel noted.

"In a world dominated by an obesity crisis and right-handers, ectomorphs can be different in their desires," he said. "Popular websites suggest they commonly express a desire to gain weight or muscle mass. Their slightly increased chance of being a 'leftie' is an additional feature that makes them different."

Related Information:

  1. Right Hand Vs Left Hand Who is Healthier? - The explanations of right-handed versus left-handed are still very vague generalizations, and no one group has been able to successfully explain why we are one way or the other.
  2. One Handed Game Controller for Playstation and PC - New Playstation 2 - 3 and PC game controller allows for one-handed use for those with disabilities - eDimensional and BenHeck
  3. Robo-Tar - Play the Guitar with One Hand - Robo-Tar is an adapted guitar that can be played using one hand and is especially suitable for persons with disabilities - Disabled World


Information from our Medical Research: News & Information section - (Full List).

Submit disability news, coming events, as well as assistive technology product news and reviews.


Loan Information for low income singles, families, seniors and disabled. Includes home, vehicle and personal loans.


Famous People with Disabilities - Well known people with disabilities and conditions who contributed to society.


List of awareness ribbon colors and their meaning. Also see our calendar of awareness dates.


Blood Pressure Chart - What should your blood pressure be, and information on blood group types/compatibility.





  1. Stuttering: Stop Signals in the Brain Prevent Fluent Speech
  2. New Peer-reviewed Journal 'Autism in Adulthood' Launching in 2019
  3. People Want to Live Longer - But Only If in Good Health
  4. Canada's Aging Population Signals Need for More Inclusive, Accessible Transportation System

Citation



Disclaimer: Content on Disabled World is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. See our Terms of Service for more information.

Reporting Errors: Disabled World is an independent website, your assistance in reporting outdated or inaccurate information is appreciated. If you find an error please let us know.