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New Efforts to Explore Health Consequences of Service in Vietnam

Published: 2009-09-15
Author: Department of Veterans Affairs

Synopsis: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to better understand the health consequences of service in Vietnam.

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Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki announced today plans to begin additional research by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to better understand the health consequences of service in Vietnam.

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Secretary Shinseki Announces New Efforts to Explore Health Consequences of Service in Vietnam

Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki announced today plans to begin additional research by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to better understand the health consequences of service in Vietnam.

"The National Vietnam Veterans Longitudinal Study (NVVLS) will allow VA to pursue another valuable research tool," Secretary Shinseki said. "The insight we gain from this study will help give us an understanding of how to better serve America's Veterans."

NVVLS will study the Vietnam generation's physical and psychological health. The new study will supplement research already underway at VA, including studies on PTSD and on the health of women Vietnam Veterans. This is a follow-up study to a previous one that concluded in 1988.

VA has begun work to solicit bids to conduct the study, which is expected to run from 2011 through 2013.

VA is responsible for providing federal benefits to Veterans and their families. VA is the second largest of the 15 cabinet departments and operates nationwide programs for health care, financial assistance and burial benefits. The VA health care system operates more than 1,400 sites of care. Nearly 5.5 million people received care in VA health care facilities in 2008.

In Other Veterans Affairs News:

Secretary Shinseki Announces $1 Million for Aurora Site

Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki has announced the award of a $936,276 contract by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to a Washington state company for demolition and site clearing of VA's new medical center in Aurora, Colo.

"This contract brings VA's 21st century health care system closer to the Veterans of Colorado," said Secretary Shinseki. "The contract is proof of VA's commitment to Colorado's Veterans. It also encourages the success of businesses owned by Veterans who were disabled during their military service."

This is the first of several contracts that will provide a new state-of-the-art VA medical center consisting of inpatient hospital beds, a community living center, a spinal cord injury center and outpatient services. The total cost of the new facility is $800 million, with completion projected in 2012.

GSA-JV of Bellevue, Wash., a service-disabled, Veteran-owned business, was awarded the contract, which calls for building demolition, site surfacing and hazardous materials abatement at the location of the former Fitzsimons Army Hospital.

Last year, VA spent more than $2.2 billion in Colorado on behalf of the state's 426,000 Veterans. In Colorado, VA operates medical centers in Denver and Grand Junction, 13 outpatient clinics, four Vet Centers and two national cemeteries.

In Other News:

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Cite This Page (APA): Department of Veterans Affairs. (2009, September 15). New Efforts to Explore Health Consequences of Service in Vietnam. Disabled World. Retrieved September 21, 2021 from www.disabled-world.com/news/veterans/health-vietnam.php