Lyme Disease Ticks Reported in Nearly 50% of US Counties

Lyme Disease

Author: Entomological Society of America
Published: 2016/01/19 - Updated: 2023/10/03
Publication Type: Research Study Analysis - Peer-Reviewed: Yes
Contents: Summary - Introduction - Main - Related

Synopsis: Study reveals the blacklegged tick reported in more than 45% of U.S. counties, compared to 30% of counties in 1998. Most of the geographic expansion of the blacklegged tick appears to be in the northern U.S. Even more alarming, the blacklegged tick is now considered established in twice the number of counties as in 1998.

Introduction

Lyme disease is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus), and the range of these ticks is spreading, according to research published in the Journal of Medical Entomology.

Main Digest

Lyme disease, also known as Lyme borreliosis, is an infectious disease caused by bacteria of the Borrelia type. The most common sign of infection is an expanding area of redness, known as erythema migrans, that begins at the site of the bite about a week after it has occurred. The rash is typically neither itchy nor painful. About 25% of people do not develop a rash. Other early symptoms may include fever, headache, and feeling tired. If untreated, symptoms may include loss of the ability to move one or both sides of the face, joint pains, severe headaches with neck stiffness, or heart palpitations among others.

As some symptoms of Lyme disease include fever, headache, and fatigue, all of which can be mistaken for the common flu, so medical personnel need to know where these ticks are found in order to make a correct diagnosis. Unfortunately, the range of blacklegged ticks had not been re-evaluated in nearly two decades, until now.

Dr. Rebecca Eisen, a research biologist at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, observed that the last comprehensive survey of blacklegged tick distribution was published in 1998. To remedy this, she and her colleagues performed a new survey to establish the current geographic distribution.

The team used surveillance methods similar to those used in 1998 so that they would be able to accurately judge the degree to which the distribution of these ticks had changed. Using the gathered data, they figured out which counties had established populations, which ones had one or more reports of a blacklegged ticks, and which ones had none.

They found that the blacklegged tick has been reported in more than 45% of U.S. counties, compared to 30% of counties in 1998. Even more alarming, the blacklegged tick is now considered established in twice the number of counties as in 1998.

Most of the geographic expansion of the blacklegged tick appears to be in the northern U.S., while populations in southern states have remained relatively stable. The range of the western blacklegged tick only increased from 3.4% to 3.6% of counties.

"This study shows that the distribution of Lyme disease vectors has changed substantially over the last nearly two decades and highlights areas where risk for human exposure to ticks has changed during that time," Dr. Eisen said. "The observed range expansion of the ticks highlights a need for continuing and enhancing vector surveillance efforts, particularly along the leading edges of range expansion."

Full article, "County-Scale Distribution of Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the Continental United States".

Attribution/Source(s):

This peer reviewed publication was selected for publishing by the editors of Disabled World due to its significant relevance to the disability community. Originally authored by Entomological Society of America, and published on 2016/01/19 (Edit Update: 2023/10/03), the content may have been edited for style, clarity, or brevity. For further details or clarifications, Entomological Society of America can be contacted at entsoc.org. NOTE: Disabled World does not provide any warranties or endorsements related to this article.

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Cite This Page (APA): Entomological Society of America. (2016, January 19 - Last revised: 2023, October 3). Lyme Disease Ticks Reported in Nearly 50% of US Counties. Disabled World. Retrieved July 22, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/health/neurology/lyme-disease/blacklegged-tick.php

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