Decreasing Unnecessary Antibiotic Use

Medical Research and News

Author: Infectious Diseases Society of America
Published: 2011/07/30 - Updated: 2022/01/28
Contents: Summary - Introduction - Main - Related

Synopsis: Following an outbreak of Clostridium difficile infections health care professionals in Quebec targeted physicians and pharmacists with an education campaign that reduced outpatient antibiotic use. The Quebec Minister of Health and the Quebec Medication Council collaborated with designated physicians and pharmacists to develop guidelines to improve prescribing practices. It is possible to decrease antibiotic consumption when physicians, pharmacists, state governments, etc., are working together for a common goal. This is the key to success: having everybody involved and speaking with a common voice.

Introduction

Simple guidelines decreased unnecessary antibiotic use in Quebec, Canada...

Main Digest

Antibiotic overuse and resistance have emerged as major threats during the past two decades.

Following an outbreak of Clostridium difficile infections, which often result from antibiotic use, health care professionals in Quebec, Canada targeted physicians and pharmacists with an education campaign that reduced outpatient antibiotic use, according to a study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and now available online.

The Quebec Minister of Health and the Quebec Medication Council collaborated with designated physicians and pharmacists to develop guidelines to improve prescribing practices.

First issued in January 2005, the guidelines emphasized proper antibiotic use, including not prescribing antibiotics when viral infections were suspected and selecting the shortest possible duration of treatment. Approximately 30,000 printed copies of the original recommendations were distributed to all physicians and pharmacists in Quebec. An additional 193,500 copies were downloaded from the Medication Council's website.

During the year after the guidelines were initially distributed, the number of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions in Quebec decreased 4.2 percent. In other Canadian provinces, the number of these prescriptions increased 6.5 percent during the same period.

According to study author Karl Weiss, MD, of the University of Montreal:

"It is possible to decrease antibiotic consumption when physicians, pharmacists, state governments, etc., are working together for a common goal. This is the key to success: having everybody involved and speaking with a common voice."

Dr. Weiss added:

"Simple, short, easy-to-use guidelines have an impact on physicians when they are readily available. The web is an increasingly important tool to reach our audience and should now be used as such in the future. With handheld electronic devices available for all health care professionals, these down-loadable guidelines can be accessed and used at any time and any circumstance."

Founded in 1979, Clinical Infectious Diseases publishes clinical articles twice monthly in a variety of areas of infectious disease, and is one of the most highly regarded journals in this specialty. It is published under the auspices of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Based in Arlington, Va., IDSA is a professional society representing more than 9,000 physicians and scientists who specialize in infectious diseases.

Attribution/Source(s):

This quality-reviewed publication was selected for publishing by the editors of Disabled World due to its significant relevance to the disability community. Originally authored by Infectious Diseases Society of America, and published on 2011/07/30 (Edit Update: 2022/01/28), the content may have been edited for style, clarity, or brevity. For further details or clarifications, Infectious Diseases Society of America can be contacted at idsociety.org. NOTE: Disabled World does not provide any warranties or endorsements related to this article.

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Cite This Page (APA): Infectious Diseases Society of America. (2011, July 30 - Last revised: 2022, January 28). Decreasing Unnecessary Antibiotic Use. Disabled World. Retrieved July 20, 2024 from www.disabled-world.com/medical/antibiotic-use.php

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