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Alpha Lipoic Acid as an Antioxidant

  • Published: 2008-12-19 (Revised/Updated 2014-08-01) : Darrell Miller (-).
  • Synopsis: Alpha lipoic acid is the ideal antioxidant it can scavenge free radicals of both fat and water-based cell structures and rapidly assimilates and absorbs into cells.

Main Document

Quote: "Research has shown that ALA may even play a role in the treatment of neurological disorders such as Huntington's disease."

Alpha lipoic acid is the ideal antioxidant for five main reasons. It can scavenge free radicals of all kinds of both fat and water-based cell structures. It rapidly assimilates and absorbs into cells. Alpha lipoic acid boosts the action of other protective compounds. It chelates free metal ions and it also promotes normal cell replication.

Alpha lipoic acid (ALA) is both fat and water soluble, which makes it a superior free-radical scavenger because it can protect lipid (fat) and aqueous (water) cell parts from free-radical damage. This ability allows ALA to offer excellent cellular protection because it can easily transport across cell membranes and give oxidant protection outside and inside cell structures. ALA has the ability to freely move throughout all cell parts, scavenging for free radicals in a way that is definitely more effective than other antioxidant compounds. Vitamin C, for example, is a good antioxidant but is strictly water soluble and only affects the interior of cells. On the other hand, vitamin E is only fat soluble, meaning that it affects only the lipid portion of cell structures or the membrane, which leaves other areas unprotected.

Cellular glutathione, which is produced in the body and works to neutralize free radicals, is very difficult to artificially boost. Although oral glutathione supplements are available, they have to go through the GI route before they enter the blood stream, leaving little glutathione which actually survives this process. Because of this, cellular levels are not significantly increase by oral supplementation. ALA has been found to help regenerate glutathione by providing extra cellular protection.

If the body becomes deficient in ALA, other antioxidant compounds may not work well.

ALA plays an important role in boosting the activity of protective compounds such as vitamin E. ALA dramatically extends the life and effectiveness of other vital compounds.

ALA has been used for decades to treat diabetic conditions and complications including diabetic neuropathy, with ALA actually having the ability to initiate a reverse in the condition in some cases. Additionally, ALA helps to boost glucose uptake and results in less insulin dependency in some cases. Among its other properties, ALA can protect brain tissue on a cellular level, as well as protect brain cells from certain hazardous chemicals.

Research has shown that ALA may even play a role in the treatment of neurological disorders such as Huntington's disease. As we are all aware, LDL cholesterol has a huge role in the development of cardiovascular disease. LDL cholesterol, which is particularly susceptible to free-radical damage, can be protected by ALA from free radical damage itself. Along with the above properties, ALA has been shown to help in strokes, cancer, cataracts, HIV, liver regeneration, and detoxification.

ALA can be purchased in tablet and capsule form and works well when it is orally ingested so that it can be easily assimilated through the walls of the gastrointestinal tract.

Taking between 40 to 50 mg of ALA is recommended for best results.

The primary applications of alpha lipoic acid are aging, aids, alcoholism, atherosclerosis, bell's palsy, cataracts, cancer, cirrhosis, diabetes, diabetic neuropathy, multiple sclerosis, liver disease, radiation sickness or exposure, Alzheimer's disease, senile dementia, stroke, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and heavy-metal poisoning.

Have you had your alpha lipoic acid today

Similar Topics

1 : Mushrooms - Antioxidants and Possible Antiaging Potential : Penn State.
2 : Evidence Reveals Antioxidant Fisetin May Reduce Mental Effects of Aging : Salk Institute.
3 : Maple Syrup Found to Protect Neurons and Nurture Minds : University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM).
4 : Lipoic Acid: Circadian Rhythms & Biological Function Benefits : Disabled World.
5 : Resveratrol Antioxidant Fails to Reduce Deaths, Heart-disease or Cancers : Johns Hopkins Medicine.
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