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New Video Game uses Brain Waves

  • Publish Date : 2008/10/09 - (Rev. 2009/01/12)
  • Author : Disabled World

Synopsis:

Willpower has released a new video game in which players move game characters via a headset that controlled by their brain waves.

Main Document

Willpower is set to replace fast fingers in a new video game in which players move characters through a headset that monitors their brain waves.

MAKUHARI, Japan - Willpower is set to replace fast fingers in a new video game in which players move characters through a headset that monitors their brain waves.

Japan's Keio University put similar technology to use this year to let a paralyzed man take a virtual stroll on the popular Second Life website, with the machine reading what he wanted to do with his immobile legs.

"For people with difficulty speaking, this can be a tool for communication," Ito said.

Ito was hopeful that the technology would eventually go on sale outside the United States. Prices have not been announced.

Earlier this year OCZ released their Neural Impulse Actuator which can measure the muscle tension in your face, eye movement, and 3 switches each for alpha and beta brain waves.

People with disabilities who have trouble using a traditional input device will certainly benefit from this new mind powering technology.

In Other News from Asia

Soy is not the cornerstone of Asian diets. This is probably by far the most common misconception about soy products. Many of the fitness magazines, and even some dietitians, overplay the role of soy in the Asian diet. In China and Japan, people only eat about 10 grams (2 teaspoons) a day. What's more, soy is viewed and consumed as a condiment, not as a replacement for animal products or as an entire meal. Basically, soy in those regions would be like ketchup or mustard, rather than the main dish.

Yasuyuki Okubo (38), a deaf company employee in the Kanazawa City, Ishikawa Prefecture, plans to reach the top of Vinson Massif (4,897 meters/16,050 ft), the highest mountain of Antarctica in December. Okubo lost hearing due to sickness at the age of three. If his challenge succeeds, he will be the first deaf person in the world according to the South Pole travel agent. He has reached both the North Pole and the South Pole in spite of his deafness. He says, "I want to tell people that the dream will be fulfilled even if you have a disability."

Aflac Inc (AFL.N: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz), the world's largest seller of supplemental disability insurance, will consider buying one of AIG's (AIG.N: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) Japan units as it sees growth potential in the country, a newspaper said on Wednesday. Aflac chief executive Daniel Amos told the Nikkei business daily in an interview that Aflac plans to assess the value of Alico Japan, though he played down the company's interest in AIG's two other local units - AIG Edison Life Insurance Co and AIG Star Life Insurance Co.

SHANGHAI: Although senior citizens would be happier if their family visited more often, they are generally satisfied with their lives in the city, a survey by the Shanghai Quality Association revealed on Monday. More than 3,390 respondents aged 55 or above took part in the survey, which inquired about current living conditions and overall satisfaction in the city. The survey, conducted last month, found that the general "happiness index" among Shanghai seniors was 77.17, a relatively high figure according to researchers.

Dubai will host a two-day international conference from October 15th-16th, on learning disabilities amongst children.

The objective of the Dubai conference will be to raise awareness of this issue and explore how to help students succeed in secondary and post-secondary education. The 2nd Gulf Cooperation Council Learning Disability Conference is intended to produce a blueprint of actions to help governments and educational institutions design curriculum, evolve interventional methods and build up training resources to address the problems of underachievers. The conference in Dubai will be attended by some 400 delegates from parents and teachers to professionals in numerous different areas of special needs.

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